The Collected Poems of William Carlos Williams: 1909-1939

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New Directions Publishing, 1986 - Poetry - 604 pages
4 Reviews
So that readers could more fully understand the extent of Williams' radical simplicity, all of his published poetry, excluding Paterson, was reissued in two definite volumes, of which this is the first.
 

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The collected poems of William Carlos Williams

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Except for Paterson and Poems (1909), a volume that Williams himself rejected, this first volume of a projected two-volume set contains all the published poems written from 1909 to 1939, a year that ... Read full review

Review: The Collected Poems, Vol. 1: 1909-1939

User Review  - Lukas - Goodreads

Sometimes he's on point. Other times he writes about chickens and shit. Dig on his prose much better. Read full review

Contents

Poplars of the meadow
13
The Uses of Poetry
21
De Gustibus
25
Idyl Wine of the grey sky
43
Grotesque
49
Sick African
59
AL QUE QUIERE 1917
61
You have come between me
121
Question and Answer
321
Full Moon
336
Rain
343
Our American Ragcademicians
364
AN EARLY MARTYR AND OTHER POEMS 1935
375
ADAM EVE THE CITY 1936
403
The dawn is upon us
427
The Young Cat and the Chrysanthemums
439

St Francis Einstein of the Daffodils first version
130
SPRING AND ALL 1923
175
Wild Orchard
239
From a Book
248
Interests of 1926
258
Emily Dickinson Wellcome
274
The Conservation of the Human SubSpecies
281
THE DESCENT OF WINTER 1928
289
A Note on the Text
467
And Thus with All Praise
475
Tables of Contents for Collected Poems 19211931
549
Three Additional Poems
566
Index of Titles
573
Index of First Lines
579
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About the author (1986)

Poet, artist, and practicing physician of Rutherford, New Jersey, William Carlos Williams wrote poetry that was experimental in form, ranging from imagism to objectivism, with great originality of idiom and human vitality. Credited with changing and directing American poetry toward a new metric and language, he also wrote a large number of short stories and novels. Paterson (1946--58), about the New Jersey city of that name, was his epic and places him with Ezra Pound of the Cantos as one of the great shapers of the long poem in this century. National recognition did not come early, but eventually Williams received many honors, including a vice-presidency of the National Institute of Arts and Letters (1952); the Bollingen Prize (1953); the $5,000 fellowship of the Academy of American Poets; the Loines Award for poetry of the National Institute of Arts and Letters (1948); and the Brandeis Award (1957). Book II of Paterson received the first National Book Award for poetry in 1949. Williams was named consultant in poetry in English to the Library of Congress for 1952--53. Williams's continuously inventive style anchored not only objectivism, the school to which he most properly belongs, but also a long line of subsequent poets as various as Robert Lowell, Frank O'Hara, and Allen Ginsberg. With Stevens, he forms one of the most important sources of a specifically American tradition of modernism. In addition to his earlier honors, Williams received two important awards posthumously, the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry (1963) and the Gold Medal for Poetry from the National Institute of Arts and Letters (1963).

Arthur Walton Litz, Jr. was born on October 31, 1929. He was an American literary historian and critic who served as professor of English Literature at Princeton University from 1956 to 1993. He is the author or editor of over twenty collections of literary criticism. Litz graduated from Princeton University in 1951 and received his Ph.D. from Oxford University while studying on a Rhodes Scholarship at Merton College in 1951-54. He became the Holmes Professor of English Literature at Princeton in 1956. He was named to the Eastman Visiting Professorship at Balliol College, Oxford in 1989. Bread Loaf professor from the early 1970s through the early 1990s and a literary historian and critic who served as professor of English literature at Princeton University from 1956 to 1993, Arthur Litz, Jr. died on June 4, 2014, at University Medical Center of Princeton in New Jersey.

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