Nineteen Sixteen

Front Cover
Forge, 1998 - Fiction - 447 pages
2 Reviews
Ned Halloran has lost both his parents, and almost his own life, to the sinking of the Titanic, and has lost his sister to America. Determined to keep what little he has, he returns to Ireland and enrolls at Saint Enda's school in Dublin. Saint Enda's headmaster is the renowned scholar and poet, Patrick Pearse - who is soon to gain greater and undying fame as a rebel and patriot. Ned becomes totally involved with the growing revolution...and the sacrifices it will demand.
Meanwhile, in America, his sister feels her own urge toward freedom, both for her native Ireland and herself. Kathleen too becomes involved in the larger struggle, as America's role in the Irish fight for freedom escalates.
The novel examines the Irish fight for freedom, which parallels in so many ways America's own bid for independence. For the first time, it gives us a look at the heroic women who were willing to fight and die beside their men for the sake of the future. Above all, 1916 is the story of the valiant patriots who, for a few unforgettable days, held out against the might of empire to realize an impossible dream.

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Review: 1916: A Novel of the Irish Rebellion (Irish Century Novels #1)

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I never expected a book on a rebellion to be slow. It started off well, but kept slipping from there as it dragged on with little of importance or interest actually happening. Most of the book was ... Read full review

About the author (1998)

Author and historian Morgan Llywelyn was born in New York City to Irish parents. As a teenager, she moved to Texas and by the age of sixteen was showing horses at championship levels throughout the United States. She made the shortlist for the United States Olympic Team in Dressage in 1976, but did not make the team. She also modeled for Neiman-Marcus and was a dance instructor for Arthur Murray. She writes historical novels that deal with her Celtic roots and is recognized as an expert in early Irish history and folklore. Her first novel was The Wind from Hastings, but she is better known for her second novel Lion of Ireland: The Legend of Brian Boru, which was published in 1980 and has never been out of print. In 1990, she started writing for children and young adults. She won the 1991 Irish Children's Book Trust Bisto Award for Brian Boru and the 1993 Bisto Award in the Historical Fiction category and the 1993 Reading Association of Ireland Award for Strongbow: The Story of Richard and Aoife. She also writes short stories and has co-authored two fantasy novels with Michael Scott. She currently lives in Ireland.

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