The Later Works, 1925-1953: 1933

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SIU Press, 1986 - Education - 392 pages
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John Dewey's Experience and Nature has been considered the fullest expression of his mature philosophy since its eagerly awaited publication in 1925. Irwin Edman wrote at that time that "with monumental care, detail and completeness, Professor Dewey has in this volume revealed the metaphysical heart that beats its unvarying alert tempo through all his writings, whatever their explicit themes." In his introduction to this volume, Sidney Hook points out that "Dewey's Experience and Nature is both the most suggestive and most difficult of his writings." The meticulously edited text published here as the first volume in the series The Later Works of John Dewey, 1925-1953 spans that entire period in Dewey's thought by including two important and previously unpublished documents from the book's history: Dewey's unfinished new introduction written between 1947 and 1949, edited by the late Joseph Ratner, and Dewey's unedited final draft of that introduction written the year before his death. In the intervening years Dewey realized the impossibility of making his use of the word 'experience' understood. He wrote in his 1951 draft for a new introduction: "Were I to write (or rewrite) Experience and Nature today I would entitle the book Culture and Nature and the treatment of specific subject-matters would be correspondingly modified. I would abandon the term 'experience' because of my growing realization that the historical obstacles which prevented understanding of my use of 'experience' are, for all practical purposes, insurmountable. I would substitute the term 'culture' because with its meanings as now firmly established it can fully and freely carry my philosophy of experience."
 

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Contents

Outlawry of War
13
The SocialEconomic Situation and Education
43
The Underlying Philosophy of Education
77
Preface to the New Edition
107
Why Reflective Thinking Must
125
Native Resources in Training Thought
140
School Conditions and the Training
156
The Process and Product of Reflective
171
Empirical and Scientific Thought
268
Activity and the Training of Thought
281
From the Concrete to the Abstract
293
Language and the Training of Thought
301
Observation and Information
315
The Recitation and the Training
326
Some General Conclusions
342
The Adventure of Persuasion Review
355

Analysis of Reflective Thinking
196
The Place of Judgment in Reflective
210
Conception and Definition
235
Control of Data
248
Control of Reasoning
259
A Challenge to Criticism Review of Martin
360
Foreword to The Educational Frontier
374
Emendations List
393
LineEnd Hyphenation
415
Copyright

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About the author (1986)

Richard Rorty is Kenan Professor of Humanities at the University of Vir­ginia.

 

Jo Ann Boydston is Director of the Center for Dewey Studies.

 

Bridget A. Walsh and Harriet Furst Simon are staff members at the Center for Dewey Studies.