Jewish Responses to Persecution: 1933-1938

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Rowman & Littlefield, 2010 - History - 469 pages
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Jewish Responses to Persecution, 1933–1946 offers a new perspective on Holocaust history by presenting documentation that describes the manifestations and meanings of Nazi Germany's "final solution" from the Jewish perspective. This first volume, taking us from Hitler's rise to power through the aftermath of Kristallnacht, vividly reveals the increasing devastation and confusion wrought in Jewish communities in and beyond Germany at the time. Numerous period photos, documents, and annotations make this unique series an invaluable research and teaching tool. Co-published with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.
 

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Contents

Confronting the Nazi Revolution
7
Boycott
16
Physical Threats
24
Exclusion and Introspection
33
Jewish Leadership and the Jewish Sector
45
Strategies for Survival
63
Targets of the Peoples Community
74
Taking Stock after One Year
84
Jewish Culture and Leisure in Nazi Germany
236
Jewish Questions after Nuremberg
247
How to Behave and Think as a Jew
251
Contending with Crisis
259
DISPOSSESSION AND DISAPPEARANCE 1938
271
Model Austria and Its Ramifications
275
Intensifying Racial Segregation
286
Reverberations in the Reich
290

FEELING ONES WAY JANUARY 1934 TO AUGUST 1935
95
Stretching the Limits of Influence
99
Constrained Communications
108
Everyday Life in an Era of Uncertainty
117
Negotiating Public Spaces
123
Jewish Children in the Schools of the Peoples Community
132
Segregation and Exclusion spring and summer 1935
145
Mounting Pressure Changing Perspectives
154
The Onslaught of the Peoples Community
162
SUBJECTS UNDER SIEGE SEPTEMBER 1935 TO DECEMBER 1937
177
The Nuremberg Laws and Their Impact
183
Could One Live in the New Germany?
199
Bonds and Breaks with Germany
215
Uneven Chances Varied Fates
228
Evian and the Emigration Impasse
305
Defense without Weapons
324
Refuge and Reflection
331
kristallnacht and Its Consequences
341
Experiencing the Pogrom
349
What Next?
367
List of Documents
379
Bibliography
397
Glossary
409
Chronology
437
Index
453
About the Authors
469
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

Jurgen Matthaus is research director at the Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Mark Roseman is professor in the Department of History and Pat M. Glazier Chair of the Jewish Studies Program at Indiana University Bloomington.

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