The Later Works, 1925-1953, Volume 11

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SIU Press, 1987 - Philosophy - 792 pages
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John Dewey's Experience and Nature has been considered the fullest expression of his mature philosophy since its eagerly awaited publication in 1925. Irwin Edman wrote at that time that "with monumental care, detail and completeness, Professor Dewey has in this volume revealed the metaphysical heart that beats its unvarying alert tempo through all his writings, whatever their explicit themes." In his introduction to this volume, Sidney Hook points out that "Dewey's Experience and Nature is both the most suggestive and most difficult of his writings." The meticulously edited text published here as the first volume in the series The Later Works of John Dewey, 1925-1953 spans that entire period in Dewey's thought by including two important and previously unpublished documents from the book's history: Dewey's unfinished new introduction written between 1947 and 1949, edited by the late Joseph Ratner, and Dewey's unedited final draft of that introduction written the year before his death. In the intervening years Dewey realized the impossibility of making his use of the word 'experience' understood. He wrote in his 1951 draft for a new introduction: "Were I to write (or rewrite) Experience and Nature today I would entitle the book Culture and Nature and the treatment of specific subject-matters would be correspondingly modified. I would abandon the term 'experience' because of my growing realization that the historical obstacles which prevented understanding of my use of 'experience' are, for all practical purposes, insurmountable. I would substitute the term 'culture' because with its meanings as now firmly established it can fully and freely carry my philosophy of experience."
 

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Contents

Preface
3
The Crisis in Liberalism
23
Renascent Liberalism
41
An Empirical Survey of Empiricisms
69
Mystical Naturalism and Religious Humanism
84
Kinds and Classes
95
What Are Universals?
105
One Current Religious Problem
115
The Moscow Trials
326
The Teacher and His World
339
Youth in a Confused World
353
Liberalism and Equality
368
Class Struggle and the Democratic Way
382
President Hutchins Proposals to Remake
397
The Founder of Pragmatism Review of Collected Papers
421
Bergson on Instinct Review of Henri Bergsons The
428

World High Court for Knowledge?
127
Whiteheads Philosophy
146
Tribute to F C S Schiller
155
The Need for Orientation
162
Education and New Social Ideals
167
The Challenge of Democracy to Education
181
2Q59HUBLN0
187
Appendix 2
202
Democracy and Educational Administration
217
What Is Learning?
238
Socialization of Ground Rent
256
Our UnFree Press
269
A Liberal Speaks Out for Liberalism
282
Democracy Is Radical
296
Truth Is on the March
310
The Jameses Review of Ralph Barton Perrys The Thought
441
Religion Science and Philosophy Review of Bertrand
454
Charles Sanders Peirce Review of Collected Papers
479
Review of Stephen Spenders Forward from Liberalism
496
Foreword to Education in the Soviet Union edited
509
2
526
An Active Flexible Personality by John Dewey Boyd
548
Comment on Horace Meyer Kallens What Pragmatism
563
Mystical Naturalism and Religious Humanism
583
Grammar Rhetoric and Mr Dewey
592
textual apparatus
607
Emendations List
658
Alterations in Manuscripts
705
Checklist of Deweys References
727
Copyright

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About the author (1987)

Jo Ann Boydston is Director of the Center for Dewey Studies.  

John J. McDermott is Distinguished Professor of Philosophy, Texas A & M University.