The Later Works, 1925-1953, Volume 12

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SIU Press, 1986 - Philosophy - 793 pages
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John Dewey's Experience and Nature has been considered the fullest expression of his mature philosophy since its eagerly awaited publication in 1925. Irwin Edman wrote at that time that "with monumental care, detail and completeness, Professor Dewey has in this volume revealed the metaphysical heart that beats its unvarying alert tempo through all his writings, whatever their explicit themes." In his introduction to this volume, Sidney Hook points out that "Dewey's Experience and Nature is both the most suggestive and most difficult of his writings." The meticulously edited text published here as the first volume in the series The Later Works of John Dewey, 1925-1953 spans that entire period in Dewey's thought by including two important and previously unpublished documents from the book's history: Dewey's unfinished new introduction written between 1947 and 1949, edited by the late Joseph Ratner, and Dewey's unedited final draft of that introduction written the year before his death. In the intervening years Dewey realized the impossibility of making his use of the word 'experience' understood. He wrote in his 1951 draft for a new introduction: "Were I to write (or rewrite) Experience and Nature today I would entitle the book Culture and Nature and the treatment of specific subject-matters would be correspondingly modified. I would abandon the term 'experience' because of my growing realization that the historical obstacles which prevented understanding of my use of 'experience' are, for all practical purposes, insurmountable. I would substitute the term 'culture' because with its meanings as now firmly established it can fully and freely carry my philosophy of experience."
 

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Contents

Preface
3
Biological
30
Cultural
48
Common Sense and Scientific Inquiry
66
The Needed Reform of Logic
86
The Pattern of Inquiry
105
The Construction of Judgment
123
Understanding
142
Formal Functions and Canons
327
Terms or Meanings
347
Form and Matter
369
Mathematical Discourse
391
Induction and Deduction
415
Scientific LawsCausation and Sequences
437
Scientific Method and Scientific Subject
458
Social Inquiry
481

Evaluation
161
Judgment
182
The Function of Propositions of Quantity
200
Judgment as SpatialTemporal
220
General
244
Generic and Universal Propositions
263
General Theory of Propositions
283
Propositions Ordered in Sets and Series
310
The Logic of Inquiry and Philosophies
506
TEXTUAL APPARATUS
529
Emendations List
550
LineEnd Hyphenation
764
Checklist of Deweys References
771
pagination key to the first edition
790
Copyright

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About the author (1986)

The late Ernest Nagel was University Professor Emeritus at Columbia Univer sity.

Jo Ann Boydston is Director of the Center for Dewey Studies.

Kathleen E. Poulos is a staff member at the Center for Dewey Studies.