John Dewey: The Later Works, 1925-1953 : 1938-1939/Experience and Education, Freedom and Culture, Theory of Valuation, and Essays, Volume 13

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SIU Press, Jan 1, 1988 - Social Science
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This volume includes all Dewey's writings for 1938 except forLogic: The Theory of Inquiry (Volume 12 of The Later Works), as well as his 1939Freedom and Culture, Theory of Valuation, and two items from Intelligence in the Modern World.

Freedom and Culture presents, as Steven M. Cahn points out, the essence of his philosophical position: a commitment to a free society, critical intelligence, and the education required for their advance.”

 

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Contents

Preface
3
Traditional vs Progressive Education
5
The Need of a Theory of Experience
11
Criteria of Experience
17
Social Control
31
The Nature of Freedom
39
The Meaning of Purpose
43
Progressive Organization of SubjectMatter
48
Democracy and America
173
The Determination of Ultimate Values or Aims
255
Unity of Science as a Social Problem
271
Does Human Nature Change?
286
Education Democracy and Socialized Economy
304
The Unity of the Human Being
323
What Is Social Study?
338
The Philosophy of the Arts
357

ExperienceThe Means and Goal of Education
61
Freedom and Culture
63
The Problem of Freedom
65
Culture and Human Nature
80
The American Background
99
Totalitarian Economics and Democracy
116
Democracy and Human Nature
136
Science and Free Culture
156
Alfred L HallQuests Editorial Foreword
375
Dr Bode on Authentic Democracy
384
NOTES
401
Emendations List
432
Substantive Variants in Theory of Valuation
448
LineEnd Hyphenation
562
Pagination Keys
591
Copyright

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About the author (1988)

Steven M. Cahn is Professor of Philosophy and Provost in the Graduate School of the City University of New York. His most recent book isSaints and Scamps: Ethics in Academia.

Jo Ann Boydston is Distinguished Professor at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale and Director of the Center for Dewey Studies.

Barbara Levine is a staff member of the Center.

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