1949: A Novel of the Irish Free State

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Macmillan, Feb 22, 2003 - Fiction - 416 pages
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The masterly epic, The Irish Century, continues in 1949, a sequel to 1916 and 1921.

The struggle of the Irish people for independence is one of the compelling historical dramas of the twentieth century. Morgan Llywelyn has chosen it as the subject of her major work, a meticulously researched, multinovel chronicle that began with 1916, continued in 1921, and that she now brings up to the midcentury in 1949.

Her new novel book tells the story of Ursula Halloran, a fiercely independent young woman who comes of age in the 1920s. She experiences the tumult of the times in a way that brings those days vividly alive for every reader. The tragedy of Irish civil war gives way in the 1920s to a repressive Catholic state led by Eamon De Valera. Married women cannot hold jobs, divorce is illegal, and the IRA has become a band of outlaws still devoted to and fighting for a Republic that never lived. The Great Depression stalks the world, and war is always on the horizon, whether in Northern Ireland, Spain, or elsewhere on the European continent.

Ursula, the adopted daughter of a revolutionary, Ned Halloran, remains an idealist believing in Ireland. She works for the fledgling Irish radio service and then for the League of Nations, while her personal life is torn between two men: an Irish civil servant and an English pilot. One is too much a gentleman, and the other too much a scoundrel.

Defying Church and State, Ursula bears a child out of wedlock, though she must leave the country to do so, and nearly loses her life in the opening days of World War II. Eventually she returns to an Ireland that is steadfastly determined to remain neutral during the war; an Ireland shaken by the great duel between De Valera and Winston Churchill. As always with Ireland, politics and passion go hand in hand.

1949 is the story of one strong woman who lives through the progress of Ireland from a broken land to the beginnings of a modern independent state.
 

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User Review  - daisymr2 - LibraryThing

Book about a cathloic female who chooses to stay single in Ireland. She has romances but nothing towards marriage except one man. Alas..he is a Brit. Wonderful historical knowledge of Ire's pleas for ... Read full review

Contents

Chapter One
1
Chapter Two
9
Chapter Three
14
Chapter Four
19
Chapter Five
25
Chapter Six
31
Chapter Seven
37
Chapter Eight
41
Chapter ThirtyTwo
174
Chapter ThirtyThree
177
Chapter ThirtyFour
185
Chapter ThirtyFive
192
Chapter ThirtySix
198
Chapter ThirtySeven
207
Chapter ThirtyEight
212
Chapter ThirtyNine
217

Chapter Nine
47
Chapter Ten
53
Chapter Eleven
56
Chapter Twelve
61
Chapter Thirteen
67
Chapter Fourteen
79
Chapter Fifteen
84
Chapter Sixteen
89
Chapter Seventeen
92
Chapter Eighteen
97
Chapter Nineteen
103
Chapter Twenty
109
Chapter TwentyOne
118
Chapter TwentyTwo
122
Chapter TwentyThree
126
Chapter TwentyFour
130
Chapter TwentyFive
136
Chapter TwentySix
145
Chapter TwentySeven
149
Chapter TwentyEight
154
Chapter TwentyNine
161
Chapter Thirty
164
Chapter ThirtyOne
169
Chapter Forty
222
Chapter FortyOne
227
Chapter FortyTwo
236
Chapter FortyThree
242
Chapter FortyFour
245
Chapter FortyFive
256
Chapter FortySix
268
Chapter FortySeven
276
Chapter FortyEight
285
Chapter FortyNine
293
Chapter Fifty
298
Chapter FiftyOne
301
Chapter FiftyTwo
311
Chapter FiftyThree
319
Chapter FiftyFour
325
Chapter FiftyFive
332
Chapter FiftySix
339
Chapter FiftySeven
347
Ireland Act 1949
351
Source Notes
352
Bibliography
358
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About the author (2003)

Since 1980 Morgan Llywelyn has created an entire body of work chronicling the Celts and Ireland, from the earliest times to the present day. her critically acclaimed novels, both of history and of mythology, have been translated into many languages. She is an Irish citizen and lives in Dublin.

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