194X: Architecture, Planning, and Consumer Culture on the American Home Front

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U of Minnesota Press, 2009 - Architecture - 254 pages
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During the Second World War, American architecture was in a state of crisis. Therationing of building materials and restrictions on nonmilitary construction continued the privations that the profession had endured during the Great Depression. In a major study of American architecture during World War II, Andrew M. Shanken focuses on the culture of anticipation that arose in this period, as out-of-work architects turned their energies from the built to the unbuilt, redefining themselves as planners and creating original designs to excite the public about postwar architecture. Shanken recasts the wartime era as a crucible for the intermingling of modernist architecture and consumer culture.
 

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Contents

Planning the Postwar Architect
1
The Rhetoric and Imagery of Home Front Anticipation
15
Mature Economy Theory and the Language of Renewal
59
Architects and Consumer Culture
96
The Building Boom and the Invention of Normalcy
159
Afterword
196
Wartime Advertising Campaigns
199
Notes
209
Bibliography
233
Index
245
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About the author (2009)

Andrew M. Shanken is assistant professor of architectural history at the University of California, Berkeley. His work has appeared in numerous publications, including Art Bulletin, Design Issues, Landscape, Places and Planning Perspectives.

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