1968 in America: Music, Politics, Chaos, Counterculture, and the Shaping of a Generation

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Grove Press, 1988 - History - 306 pages
Charles Kaiser's 1968 in America is widely recognized as one of the best historical accounts of the 1960s. This book devotes equal attention to the personal and the political -- and speaks with authority about such diverse figures as Bob Dylan, Eugene McCarthy, Janis Joplin, and Lyndon Johnson.
 

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Contents

Four Democrats Three Ghosts One War
xxi
Blowin in the Wind
15
Like a Rolling Stone
38
Tet The Turning Point
51
The Truth Comes Home
98
The Chimes of Freedom
122
Tears of Rage
142
It Takes a Lot to Laugh It Takes a Train to Cry
166
Desolation Row
207
This Wheels on Fire
222
The Long and Winding Road
237
If Tomorrow Wasnt Such a Long Time
246
Acknowledgments
249
Notes
253
Index
283
Copyright

Rock of Ages
182

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About the author (1988)

Charles Kaiser was born in Washington D.C. but was raised in several different cities throughout the world. He was schooled at Columbia University, where he later became a professor. Kaiser also taught at Princeton University and was a writer for the New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and Newsweek. Along with contributing articles to New York, Vanity Fair, Rolling Stone, The Washington Post, and The New York Observer, Kaiser wrote two books: 1968 in America and Gay Metropolis: 1940-1996.

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