1973 Nervous Breakdown: Watergate, Warhol, and the Birth of Post-Sixties America

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Bloomsbury Publishing USA, Dec 10, 2008 - History - 320 pages
1973 marked the end of the 1960s and the birth of a new cultural sensibility. A year of shattering political crisis, 1973 was defined by defeat in Vietnam, Roe v. Wade, the oil crisis and the Watergate hearings. It was also a year of remarkable creative ferment. From landmark movies such as The Exorcist, Mean Streets, and American Graffiti to seminal books such as Fear of Flying and Gravity's Rainbow, from the proto-punk band the New York Dolls to the first ever reality TV show, The American Family, the cultural artifacts of the year reveal a nation in the middle of a serious identity crisis. 1973 Nervous Breakdown offers a fever chart of a year of uncertainty and change, a year in which post-war prosperity crumbled and modernism gave way to postmodernism in a lively and revelatory analysis of one of the most important periods in the second half of the 20th century.
 

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User Review  - dbsovereign - LibraryThing

My goodness, this book really brought back the memories as this was the year I moved to California at 20 years old. Nixon, Watergate, the first reality TV show, and lots of groundbreaking things happening in the art world. Facinating! Read full review

1973 NERVOUS BREAKDOWN: Watergate, Warhol, and the Birth of Post-Sixties America

User Review  - Kirkus

As those who were there know, 1973 wasn't just about platforms and the Bay City Rollers.It was much weirder than all that, as Killen (History/City College of New York) chronicles, arguing that the ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
5
Reality Programming
45
Operation Homecoming
77
Personality Crisis
111
Warholism
137
Reinventing the Fifties
163
Power Shift
195
Conspiracy Nation
227
Epilogue
261
Acknowledgments
275
Index
303
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About the author (2008)

Andreas Killen is Assistant Professor of History at the City College of New York. He is the author of Berlin Electropolis, and his writing has appeared in Salon and the New York Times Magazine.

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