1st -12th Annual Report of the United States Geological and Geographical Survey of the Territories ...

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1874 - 12 pages
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Page 146 - The recent great uplift, while it probably added new plications to the accumulated plications of the past in the ancient rocks, was quite simple with respect to their total plication, and left the upper Triassic and other sedimentary beds comparatively simply structured, they having been affected alone by the later movements.
Page 116 - Pennsylvania mines, about two thousand miles distant, and the very best of the Rocky Mountain coals are obtained directly on the line of the railroad. As a fuel for locomotives and for domestic purposes, including cooking as well as warming, the coal in general answers very well. It kindles and burns freely, making a bright fire, with a yellow blaze and comparatively little smoke ; the odor of this is not so strong or disagreeable as that of the bituminous coals, and somewhat resembles the smell...
Page 1 - This region seems to be unoccupied at this time, as far as I am aware, by any other survey under the Government, and the prospect of its rapid development within the next five years, by some of the most important railroads in the West, renders it very desirable that its resources be made known to the world at as early a date as...
Page 116 - TLis tendency to crumble is the cause of great waste at the mines — all the greater that these tertiary coals can scarcely ever be. made to melt and agglutinate into a firm coke. With rare exceptions, when submitted to the coking process, they retain their form or crumble into a dry powder.
Page 48 - ... miles, in a straight line, and the average elevation above the water-level of the Arkansas River must be about 1,500 feet. Now, It is probable that three-fourths of this vast space from the Tennessee Pass to the Poncho Pass, near the head of San Luis valley, a distance of one hundred miles, has been worn out by erosion, and the greater portion of the material carried down the river and distributed over the plains. It is probable, also, that this great space was at no very ancient period filled...
Page 622 - Claspers of the male relatively long and powerful, first '. joint thickened, with a distinct _ angle at the articulation on the outside and a short, rounded, nearly semicircular process on the inside near the base, about its own diameter from the base ; second joint broad, flattened, continuous with the third joint, strongly curved, outline nearly regularly convex on the outside, until near the middle it...
Page 369 - Cope, in his report for this same year, was inclined to agree with Hayden in thinking that the period of the deposition of the sediments of this Lignite or Fort Union group, as it was also called, was one of transition from marine to lacustrine conditions and added : "It appears impossible, therefore...
Page 506 - ... received articles of bronze. Different implements of bone or stone for digging in the ground were likewise found, and are here placed before the Section for investigation. The third race which has inhabited Scandinavia came possibly from the north and east, and introduced bronze into the country ; the form of the skull is very different from that of the two former races. It is longer than the first and broader than the second, and withal prominent at the sides. I consider this race to have been...
Page 146 - ... structural geology. The ancient erosion gradually wore down the, mass to the surface of the sea, and while previously to this it was no doubt directed by the structure, yet the mass was finally leveled off irrespective of structure or relative hardnesses of its beds by the encroaching ocean, which worked over its ruins and laid them down upon the smoothed surface in the form of the Triassic and other beds. The recent great uplift...
Page 24 - ... time. They look somewhat like Chrysanthemum blooms, the orange-colored projections consisting of a gelatinous substance projecting from a central ball, chocolate in color and of a firm texture. During dry times the horns apparently disappear and only these central knots or galls are to be seen, varying from the size of a pea to an inch or more in diameter. The horns of jelly contain the spores and as they dry down the spores are carried away as dust by the passing breezes. This is in April or...

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