The Applause First Folio of Shakespeare in Modern Type

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Hal Leonard Corporation, 2001 - Drama - 1077 pages
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(Applause Books). This landmark publication is printed in clear, legible type. Each play has its own comprehensive introduction as well as extensive, expert annotations. Highlighted areas show where lines have been altered over time and also shows where verse has been changed to prose in the past (but not here!) The original compositions are marked and folio clues are highlighted.
 

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The Applause First Folio of Shakespeare in Modern Type

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Given the many modern editions of Shakespeare's plays, it is easy to forget that the text is not fixed and that an examination of the original folio still reveals many features of importance and ... Read full review

Contents

THE TEMPEST
1
THE Two Gentlemen of Verona
20
THE Merry Wives of Windsor
39
MEASURE For Measure
61
The Comedie of Errors
85
Much adoe about Nothing
101
Loves Labours lost
122
A MIDSOMMER Nights Dreame
145
The second Part of Henry the Sixt with the death of the Good Duke HUMFREY
456
The third Part of Henry the Sixt with the death of the Duke of YORKE
483
with the Landing of Earle Richmond and the Battell at Bosworth Field
509
The Famous History of the Life of King HENRY the Eight
541
THE TRAGEDIE OF Troylus and Cressida
570
The Tragedy of Coriolanus
599
The Lamentable Tragedy of Titus Andronicus
629
THE TRAGEDIE OF ROMEO and JULIET
651

The Merchant of Venice
163
As you Like it
185
THE Taming of the Shrew
208
ALLS Wellthat Ends Well
230
Twelfe Night Or what you will
255
The Winters Tale
277
The life and death of King John
305
The life and death of King Richard the Second
327
The First Part of Henry the Fourth with the Life and Death of HENRY Sirnamed HOTSPURRE
350
and the Coronation of King Henry the Fift
376
The Life of Henry the Fift
405
The first Part of Henry the Sixt
432
THE LIFE OF TYMON OF ATHENS
676
THE TRAGEDIE OF JULIUS CAESAR
699
THE TRAGEDIE OF MACBETH
721
THE TRAGEDIE OF HAMLET Prince of Denmarke
742
THE TRAGEDIE OF KING LEAR
773
The Tragedie of King Lear
775
THE TRAGEDIE OF Othello the Moore of Venice
800
THE TRAGEDIE OF Anthonie and Cleopatra
830
THE TRAGEDIE OF CYMBELINE
859
Specific Introductions TO THE THIRTYSIX PLAYS
891
Endnotes TO THE THIRTYSIX PLAYS
985
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

William Shakespeare, 1564 - 1616 Although there are many myths and mysteries surrounding William Shakespeare, a great deal is actually known about his life. He was born in Stratford-Upon-Avon, son of John Shakespeare, a prosperous merchant and local politician and Mary Arden, who had the wealth to send their oldest son to Stratford Grammar School. At 18, Shakespeare married Anne Hathaway, the 27-year-old daughter of a local farmer, and they had their first daughter six months later. He probably developed an interest in theatre by watching plays performed by traveling players in Stratford while still in his youth. Some time before 1592, he left his family to take up residence in London, where he began acting and writing plays and poetry. By 1594 Shakespeare had become a member and part owner of an acting company called The Lord Chamberlain's Men, where he soon became the company's principal playwright. His plays enjoyed great popularity and high critical acclaim in the newly built Globe Theatre. It was through his popularity that the troupe gained the attention of the new king, James I, who appointed them the King's Players in 1603. Before retiring to Stratford in 1613, after the Globe burned down, he wrote more than three dozen plays (that we are sure of) and more than 150 sonnets. He was celebrated by Ben Jonson, one of the leading playwrights of the day, as a writer who would be "not for an age, but for all time," a prediction that has proved to be true. Today, Shakespeare towers over all other English writers and has few rivals in any language. His genius and creativity continue to astound scholars, and his plays continue to delight audiences. Many have served as the basis for operas, ballets, musical compositions, and films. While Jonson and other writers labored over their plays, Shakespeare seems to have had the ability to turn out work of exceptionally high caliber at an amazing speed. At the height of his career, he wrote an average of two plays a year as well as dozens of poems, songs, and possibly even verses for tombstones and heraldic shields, all while he continued to act in the plays performed by the Lord Chamberlain's Men. This staggering output is even more impressive when one considers its variety. Except for the English history plays, he never wrote the same kind of play twice. He seems to have had a good deal of fun in trying his hand at every kind of play. Shakespeare wrote 154 sonnets, all published on 1609, most of which were dedicated to his patron Henry Wriothsley, The Earl of Southhampton. He also wrote 13 comedies, 13 histories, 6 tragedies, and 4 tragecomedies. He died at Stratford-upon-Avon April 23, 1616, and was buried two days later on the grounds of Holy Trinity Church in Stratford. His cause of death was unknown, but it is surmised that he knew he was dying.

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