200 Hundred Wild Birds of Iowa: A Handbook Adapted to Use in Schools, and as a Guide in Identification for All who Desire to Become Acquainted with Our Common Birds

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Audubon Nature Pubs., 1905 - Birds - 93 pages
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Page 2 - Linnet and meadow-lark, and all the throng That dwell in nests, and have the gift of song. "You slay them all! and wherefore? for the gain Of a scant handful more or less of wheat, Or rye, or barley, or some other grain, Scratched up at random by industrious feet, Searching for worm or weevil after rain ! Or a few cherries, that are not so sweet As are the songs these uninvited guests Sing at their feast with comfortable breasts.
Page 79 - FORBEARANCE. HAST thou named all the birds without a gun? Loved the wood-rose, and left it on its stalk? At rich men's tables eaten bread and pulse? Unarmed, faced danger with a heart of trust? And loved so well a high behavior, In man or maid, that thou from speech refrained, Nobility more nobly to repay? O, be my friend, and teach me to be thine ! THE PARK.
Page 2 - Think, every morning when the sun peeps through The dim, leaf-latticed windows of the grove, ' How jubilant the happy birds renew Their old, melodious madrigals of love! And when you think of this, remember, too, "Tis always morning somewhere, and above The awakening continents, from shore to shore, Somewhere the birds are singing evermore.
Page 2 - Do you ne'er think what wondrous beings these ? Do you ne'er think who made them, and who taught The dialect they speak, where melodies Alone are the interpreters of thought? Whose household words are songs in many keys, Sweeter than instrument of man e'er caught ! Whose habitations in the tree-tops even Are half-way houses on the road to heaven...
Page 73 - The demands on the skill and patience of the bird photographer are endless, and his pleasure is intensified in proportion to the nature of the difficulties to be overcome, and in the event of success it is perpetuated by the infinitely more satisfactory results obtained. He does not rejoice over a bag of mutilated flesh and feathers, but in the possession of a trophy — an eloquent token of his prowess as a hunter, a talisman which holds the power of revivifying the circumstances attending its acquisition.
Page 74 - ... if we can only get the camera in place of the gun and have the sportsman sunk somewhat in the naturalist and lover of wild things, the next generation will see an immense change for the better in the life of our woods and waters.
Page 74 - MY DEAR MR. JOB : As a fellow Harvard man I must thank you for your exceedingly interesting book. I have been delighted with it, and I desire to express to you my sense of the good which comes from such books as yours and from the substitution of the camera for the gun. The older I grow the less I care to shoot anything except " varmints." I do not think it at all advisable that the gun should be given up, nor does it seem to me that shooting wild game under proper restrictions can be legitimately...
Page 73 - As a one-time sportsman who yielded to none in his enjoyment of the chase, I can affirm that there is a fascination about the hunting of wild animals with a camera as far ahead of the pleasure to be derived from their pursuit with shotgun or rifle as the sport found in shooting quail is beyond that of breaking clay
Page 74 - After reading the author's previous book President Roosevelt wrote to him :— " I must thank you for your exceedingly interesting book. I have been delighted with it, and desire to express my sense of the good which comes from such books as yours, and from the substitution of the camera for the gun. The older I grow the less I care to shoot anything except
Page 73 - ... enjoyment of the chase, I can affirm that there is a fascination about the hunting of wild animals with a camera as far ahead of the pleasure to be derived from their pursuit with shotgun or rifle as the sport found in shooting Quail is beyond that of breaking clay " Pigeons." Continuing the comparison, from a sportsman's standpoint, hunting with a camera is the highest development of man's inherent love of the chase. The killing of a bird with a gun seems little short of murder after one has...

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