20 Questions about Youth & the Media

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Sharon R. Mazzarella
Peter Lang, 2007 - Education - 316 pages
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20 Questions is a comprehensive guide to today's most pressing issues in the study of children, tweens, and teens and the media. Sharon R. Mazzarella brings together leading experts to address a range of topics from government regulation and the effects of violent entertainment to the commercialization of youth culture and self-identity. This book is designed with the classroom in mind, with accessible writing and end-of-chapter questions.
 

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Contents

Chapter One How Has the KidsMedia Industry Evolved?
13
ChapterTwo How Does the U S Government Regulate Childrens Media?
29
Chapter Three Why Is Everybody Always Pickin on Youth?
45
What Can Theories
61
Chapter Five How Do Researchers Study Young People and the Media?
73
Chapter Six Whos Looking out for the Kids? How Advocates
87
Chapter Eight Should We Be Concerned about Media Violence?
117
Erica Scharrer
135
Urban Myth or Dream Come True?
179
ChapterThirteen What Are Media Literacy Effects?
197
Chapter Fourteen What Are Teenagers up to Online?
211
Chapter Fifteen How Do Kids SelfIdentities Relate to Media
225
Chapter Sixteen Just Part of the Family? Exploring the Connections
239
Chapter Seventeen How Are Girls Studies Scholars and Girls Themselves
253
Chapter Eighteen Just How Commercialized Is Childrens Culture?
267
Chapter Nineteen When It Comes to Consumer Socialization Are Children
281

Chapter Ten What Do Young People Learn about
153
Chapter Eleven How Are Children and Adolescents Portrayed
167
Chapter Twenty Do We All Live in a Shared World Culture?
299
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About the author (2007)

The Editor: Sharon R. Mazzarella is Associate Professor in the Communication Studies Department at Clemson University. She is editor of Girl Wide Web: Girls, the Internet and the Negotiation of Identity (Peter Lang, 2005) and co-editor of Growing Up Girls: Popular Culture and the Construction of Identity (Peter Lang, 1999).

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