21st Century Communication: A Reference Handbook, Volume 1

Front Cover
William F. Eadie
SAGE, May 15, 2009 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 942 pages
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The discipline of communication has grown in popularity from the time professors of journalism and speech decided, in the mid-1960s, that the term “communication” was an excellent general descriptor for the theory and research that each group aspired to create. Over time, the two groups grew closer and recognized significant overlap in their theoretical and research interests, but there were also differences in their traditions that kept them apart. While both groups agreed that communication is a practical discipline, journalism professors focused a great deal of their attention on the education of media professionals. Speech professors, on the other hand, often were more oriented to the liberal arts and valued the fact that communication could be approached from a variety of traditions, including the arts, humanities, social sciences, and even the sciences.

A key term in 21st Century communication, however, is convergence. Not only are media and technology converging with each other to produce new means of communicating, but individuals are increasingly using both new and existing communication tools to create new forms of communication. This convergence forces the various “camps” within the communication discipline to draw upon each other’s theories and research methods to keep up with explaining the rapidly changing communication environment. This convergence of ideas and theories provides a space to challenge conventional ways of thinking about the communication discipline, and that’s the goal of the SAGE 21st Century Reference Series volumes on Communication. General Editor William F. Eadie has sought to honor the diversity of the study of communication but also integrate that diversity into a coherent form, dividing communication study into four basic properties: 1) processes, 2) forms and types of communication, 3) characteristics to consider in creating messages, and 4) relationships between communicators.

Via 100 chapters, this 2-volume set (available in both print and electronic formats) highlights the most important topics, issues, questions, and debates any student obtaining a degree in the field of communication ought to have mastered for effectiveness in the 21st Century. The purpose is to provide undergraduate majors with an authoritative reference source that will serve their research needs going forward in this exciting field with more detailed information than encyclopedia entries but not as much jargon, detail or density as a journal article or a research handbook chapter.

  • Comprehensive coverage captures all the major themes and subfields within communication. For instance, Volume 1 themes include the discipline of communication, approaches to the study of communication, key processes of communication, forms and types of communication, key characteristics of messages, key communication relationships, factors affecting communication, and challenges and opportunities for communication. Themes in Volume 2 are media as communication, communication as a profession, journalism, public relations, advertising, and media management.
  • Authoritative content is provided by a stellar casts of authors who bring diverse approaches, diverse styles, and different points of view.
  • Curricular-driven emphasis provides students with initial footholds on topics of interest in researching for term papers, in preparing for GREs, in consulting to determine directions to take in pursuing a senior thesis, graduate degree, career, etc.
  • Uniform chapter structures make it easy for students to locate key information, with a more-or-less common chapter format of Introduction, Theory, Methods, Applications, Comparisons, Future Directions, Summary, Bibliography & Suggestions for Further Reading, and Cross References.
  • Availability in print and electronic formats provides students with convenient, easy access.
 

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Contents

1 Communication as An Idea and as An Ideal
3
2 Communication as A Field and as A Discipline
12
3 The Speech Tradition
22
4 The Journalism Tradition
31
Approaches to the Study of Communication
39
5 Philosophical Approaches to Communication
41
6 Rhetorical and Textual Approaches to Communication
49
7 Quantitative Approaches to Communication Research
57
50 Unwanted Communication Agression and Abuse
454
51 Sexual Harassment
463
52 Deception
471
53 Bias
479
Media as Communication
487
54 Traditional and New Media
489
55 Media Portrayals and Representations
497
56 Media Uses and Gratifications
506

8 Qualitative Ethnographic and Performative Approaches to Communication
65
9 CriticalCultural Approaches to Communication
74
10 Feminist Approaches to Communication
82
11 Queer Approaches to Communication
90
Key Processes of Communication
99
12 Message Construction and Editing
101
13 Cognition and Information Processing
110
14 Perspective Taking Adaptation and Coordination
119
15 Social Construction
128
16 Listening Understanding and Misunderstanding
137
17 Performance and Storytelling
147
18 Persuasion and Compliance Gaining
156
19 Identity as Constituted in Communication
165
Forms and Types of Communication
175
20 Conversation Dialogue and Discourse
177
21 Interviewing
186
22 Public Speaking
194
23 Deliberation Debate and Decision Making
202
24 Conflict Management and Mediation
211
25 Visual Rhetoric
220
26 Memorials and Other Forms of Collective Memory
228
Key Characteristics of Messages
237
27 The Interplay of Verbal and Nonverbal Cues
239
28 Rhetorical Style
249
29 Genre
257
30 Dramatic Elements in Messages
266
31 Rhetorical Exigency Strategy and Argumentation
275
32 Social Support
283
Key Communication Relationships
293
33 Spouses and Other Intimate Partnerships
295
34 Children Parents and Grandparents
303
35 Friends
313
36 Dating and Romantic Partners
322
37 Supervisors Subordinates and Coworkers
331
38 Social Groups Workgroups and Teams
340
39 Students and Teachers
349
40 Patients Doctors and Other Helping Relationships
358
Factors Affecting Communication
369
41 Gender
371
42 Ethnicity
380
43 Sexual Orientation
387
44 Culture
396
45 Risk
405
46 Freedom of Expression
415
47 Globalization
424
Challenges and Opportunities for Communication
433
48 Ethical and Unethical Communication
435
49 Competent and Incompetent Communication
444
57 Agenda Setting and Framing
516
58 Cultivation and Media Exposure
525
59 Virtual Reality and Presence
534
60 ComputerMediated Communication
543
61 Group Decision Support Systems
550
62 Media Literacy
558
Communication as a Profession
569
63 Professional Communication Practices
571
Journalism
581
64 The Idea of Journalism
583
65 The Changing Nature of News
592
66 Reporting Story Development and Editing
600
67 Investigative Journalism
609
68 Magazine and Feature Writing
618
69 Photojournalism
626
70 Broadcast Journalism
635
71 New Media Journalism
643
72 Media Law in the United States
652
73 Journalism Ethics
661
74 International Journalism
670
75 The Business of Journalism
679
Public Relations
687
76 History and Concepts of Public Relations
689
77 Theories and Effects of Public Relations
698
78 Public Relations Research
706
79 Ethics in Public Relations
715
80 Issues Management
724
81 Campaign Design and Management
732
82 Crisis Communication
741
83 Political Communication
749
84 International Public Relations
758
85 The Business of Public Relations
767
Advertising
777
86 History of Advertising
779
87 Research in Advertising Campaign Design
788
88 Creative Development and Copywriting in Advertising Campaigns
797
89 Media Planning for Advertising Campaigns
805
90 Integrated Marketing Communication
815
91 Social Marketing Campaigns
822
92 International Advertising
830
93 The Business of Advertising
840
Media Management
849
94 Media Economics and Ownership
851
95 Media Policy and Regulation
859
96 Radio and Television Programming
868
97 Media Convergence
877
Index
885
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About the author (2009)

William F. Eadie (Ph.D., Purdue) is Director of the School of Communication at San Diego State University, where he is responsible for leadership of a large program of 2,300 student majors and 125 faculty encompassing all aspects of communication, media, and journalism.  Prior to joining SDSU in 2001, he was Associate Director of the National Communication Association (NCA) in Washington, DC, where he worked with researchers and promoted communication research to a variety of audiences.  His other faculty appointments have been at Ohio University and California State University, Northridge, and he has served as an adjunct of visiting faculty at the University of Minnesota, University of Maryland, UCLA, and California State University, Los Angeles.  He served as the first editor of the Journal of Applied Communication Research after it became an NCA publication and also has served as President of the Western States Communication Association.  His scholarship focuses on how interpersonal rhetoric impacts on the development of relationships, and he has been an advocate for the application of communication research in ways that affect the lives of ordinary people.  He has received the NCA Golden Aniversary Award for outstanding journal article and has been elected a member of the national honorary societies Phi Kappa Phi, Golden Key, and Phi Beta Delta.  With Paul Nelson, he co-edited two books for SAGE:  The Language of Conflict and Resolution (2000) and The Changing Conversation in America: Lectures from the Smithsonian (2001).

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