365 Ways--: Retirees' Resource Guide for Productive Lifestyles

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Greenwood Publishing Group, 1996 - Family & Relationships - 215 pages
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An attractive, easy to use library of information about productive activities that are available to help retirees lead stimulating and fulfilling lives. 365 Ways…^R includes suggestions for how a retiree can become involved in education, environmental activities, competitive sports, volunteering, politics, hobbies, and international travel.

^I365 Ways… is the product of a collaborative effort of two experienced professionals in the field of aging. They have brought together, in one attractive, easy to use guide, a library of information about various activities that are available to help retired persons lead stimulating and fulfilling lives.

365 Ways… includes hundreds of suggestions for retired persons to become involved in service to the community, additional education, environmental activities, competitive sports, volunteering, politics, hobbies, and travel here and abroad. Most importantly, 365 Ways… provides the reader with an essential resource for where to go to obtain more information about the different activities — information that has never before been compiled in one easy to use book. This is a necessary reference tool for all public libraries and for special collections for the retired.

 

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Contents

EDUCATIONTEACHING AND LEARNING
11
EMPLOYMENT
51
FITNESS
57
LEISURE
79
POLITICAL ACTION and ADVOCACY
105
TRAVEL and ALTERNATIVE TOURISM
121
VOLUNTEERING and SERVICE
135
RESOURCE INDEX
203
KEY WORD INDEX
213
Copyright

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Page 16 - For this reason,' he would add, ' one ought, every day at least, to hear a little song, read a good poem, see a fine picture, and, if it were possible, to speak a few reasonable words.
Page 15 - As the traveler who has once been from home is wiser than he who has never left his own doorstep, so a knowledge of one other culture should sharpen our ability to scrutinize more steadily, to appreciate more lovingly, our own.

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About the author (1996)

Helen K. Kerschner, PhD, is Director of the University of New Mexico Center on Aging. She also is president of the American Association for International Aging. Dr. Kerschner has more than 20 years of experience in health, aging, and international development.

John E. Hansan, PhD, is a retired social worker. He spent 40 years working in or administering social welfare agencies at the local, state, and national levels. For the past several years, Dr. Hansan has been the editor of Aging Network News, and has participated in activities designed to expand and strengthen senior volunteer programs, such as RSVP, Foster Grandparent, and the Senior Companion Programs.

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