Things that Go Bump in the Night

Front Cover
Scholastic Inc., 2011 - Juvenile Fiction - 148 pages
5 Reviews
Read, watch, and listen to each chilling story in 15 minutes or less!

3:15 means several things. It's a time when things go bump in the night. A place where spooky stories find a home. A feeling... that chill running down your spine. "3" stands for listen, read, and watch. Because that's what you do with a 3:15 story. "15" is for how long it's going to take you: Fifteen minutes or less.

This collection of standalone, spooky shorts boasts urban legends, creature features, and campfire ghost stories - all re-imagined for the 21st century. Step into the world of 3:15 and you'll meet Cody Miller, a down-on-his-luck teenager whose greed exceeds his respect for the dead; Jamie Hanover, whose after-school job might cost far more than it pays; Dylan Smith, who should know better than to show off his snowboarding skills on a haunted mountain; and more.

Don't get too attached to any of them.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
2
4 stars
1
3 stars
1
2 stars
1
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - JRlibrary - LibraryThing

Intriguing idea Carman is running with; to attach video to his books. He has the Skeleton Creek series, which is up to four books now, and now he has come out with this variation. The story starts ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - daatwood - LibraryThing

This is sort of a Twilight Zone for the younger set. The online introductions to each story was pretty good at setting the stage. The written part was engaging, but predictable. The video endings were ... Read full review

Contents

CoNTeNTs
21
Mr Masons Jars
29
The lift
48
Night heart of stone
92
Take
122
Night on the Dredge
135
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2011)

Patrick Carman is the bestselling author of numerous series for young readers, including The Land of Elyon, Elliot's Park, Skeleton Creek, Atherton, Trackers, Dark Eden, and 3:15. He got his start as a storyteller weaving bedtime tales for his two daughters. He lives in Walla Walla, Washington, with his family.

Bibliographic information