3G Multimedia Network Services, Accounting, and User Profiles

Front Cover
Artech House, 2003 - Business & Economics - 318 pages
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Staking a claim of the radiocommunications spectrum will be key, as more and more telecommunications companies turn to wireless services to sustain profitability, and in some cases even maintain viability. They are preparing to fight hard for their share of the limited resource that is the radiocommunications spectrum. To ensure your company wins the battle for spectrum, this book maps out the strategies required for structuring entry and operations in the spectrum. The book helps you to master the lobbying, technical, regulatory, legal, and political tools needed for success. By explaining clearly and concisely the arcane details of domestic and international regulations governing the spectrum, this book illustrates the ways in which portions of the spectrum are allocated, assigned, and utilized. The spectrum is a limited resource and there will always be a struggle over how it is allocated and utilized. This book is insurance, helping you and your company to be successful in this struggle.
 

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Contents

Services
1
11 WORLD MOBILE STANDARDS
3
121 Infrastructure Services
4
122 Local Services
7
124 Supplementary Services
9
125 CAMEL Services
10
126 Evolution from 2G to 25G 3G and Beyond
11
127 Information Services
13
522 UP Access Server Architecture
159
53 USE CASE
166
54 RESILIENCE OF UP
169
542 Data Consistency and Synchronization
171
55 MANAGEMENT OF UP
173
551 UP Management Model
174
56 CHARGING
177
57 INTEGRATION OF DIFFERENT NETWORKS AND THEIR UP
178

SMS EMS and MMS
16
129 Picture Services
18
1210 Mobile Agenda Service and Appointment Manager
20
13 UNIFYING FIXED AND MOBILE SERVICES
21
14 MULTIMEDIA SERVICES
23
15 USER PROFILE MANAGEMENT SERVICE
25
16 ECOMMERCE MCOMMERCE AND MICROPAYMENTS
27
17 ENTERTAINMENT SERVICES
28
171 Daily Entertainment Services
30
18 REMOTE SERVICES
31
183 The House Page
32
19 AMBIENT INTELLIGENCE
33
111 VALUEADDED SERVICES TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION
34
1121 Simplicity of the User Interface
35
1123 The IMT2000 Terminal Becomes a Versatile Multimedia Device
37
113 MULTIPLAYER SERVICES
38
114 EVOLVING FROM PREVIOUS TECHNOLOGIES
41
References
42
Service Architecture
43
21 BUSINESS MODEL
44
211 Exploiting the Unified Model Depending on Business Objectives
46
212 Operators Taking Up a RetailerCentric Model
47
22 3G NETWORK ARCHITECTURE
48
221 3GPP and 3GPP2 Harmonization
49
222 3G Network Architecture
51
223 IP Multimedia Subsystem
52
224 Service Technologies in UMTS
55
23 SERVICE ARCHITECTURE CHALLENGES
61
231 Three Application Initiation Mechanisms
62
232 Application Access and Communication Services
63
233 Coordinating Distributed User DataVHE and PSE Concepts
64
234 Three Application Deployment Models
66
235 Deploying Application Triggers
67
24 3GPP STANDARD TRIGGERING MECHANISM
69
25 THE OSAPARLAY GATEWAY
70
26 ADDITIONAL THOUGHTS ON BUSINESS MODELING
74
262 An Extended Business Model for Content Distribution
76
27 NGN GLOSSARY
79
28 CONCLUSION
82
References
83
Quality of Service in Multimedia Networks
85
312 QoS Concepts
87
32 QOS IMPLEMENTATION IN THE NETWORK
92
322 Generic QoS Scenario
93
323 The Policy Decision Function
96
324 The AC Function
97
325 The ARC Function
99
33 THE UMTS SCENARIO
101
332 Basic UMTS Scenario
103
34 A POSSIBLE DSL SCENARIO
105
342 The Scenario
106
35 QOSRELATED SECURITY CONSIDERATIONS
108
352 Management Interfaces
109
353 NetworkNetwork Control Interfaces
110
36 CONCLUSION
111
References
112
User Profile Needs and Models
113
42 RATIONALE FOR THE UP CONCEPT
114
421 Why a Generic UP ConceptStandardization
115
422 Functional Requirements
116
423 Benefits for Operators and VASPs
119
424 Benefits for Subscribers and Users
121
43 MODELING CONCEPTS
122
44 USER MODEL
123
442 Actors Roles and Tasks
124
443 Identification Single and Multiple Registration Forking
127
45 LOGICAL DATA MODEL
130
451 Principles
131
452 Application Data
132
453 Subscription Data
133
454 User Data
134
455 EndUser Data
135
46 DATA DESCRIPTION METHODS
136
462 UP Components and Mapping to XML
138
463 DataType Definition Method
140
464 Information Model
141
47 OWNERSHIP OF UP DATA
143
472 UP Storage
148
473 Conclusion
151
User Profile Architectures and Use
153
521 UP Engine
154
572 Migration from 2G to 3G Network Architecture
182
58 UP USE CASE IN SERVICES
189
582 Time Dependency
190
59 CONCLUSION
191
The Need for Charging
193
62 PRICE SETTING
195
622 Perceived Value of the Content
196
627 Regulatory Aspects
197
631 Charging
198
635 Cost Control Services
199
641 Basic Multimedia Session No Roaming
200
642 Basic Multimedia Session Roaming
201
643 ThirdParty Services
202
645 Charges for Content
203
647 Mapping to 3G Architecture
204
65 MOBILE DEVICE AS MEANS OF PAYMENT
205
651 Strengths and Pitfalls
207
66 CONCLUSIONS
208
Charging Methods and Consequences
209
712 Charging for Content
210
713 Influence of ContentBased Charging on Resource Charging
212
72 POSTPAID VERSUS PREPAID
213
722 Prepaid Architecture
214
723 Credit Slicing
217
73 CHARGING INFLUENCING PARAMETERS
218
732 Duration as Charging Parameter
219
733 Volume as Charging Parameter
221
734 QoS as Charging Parameter
222
735 Location as Charging Parameter
223
736 Distance as Charging Parameter
224
74 CHARGING COMPONENTS AND CORRELATION
227
742 ValueAdded Service Components
228
744 NetworkBased Components
229
745 Content Component
230
748 Correlation
231
75 INFORMATION TO THE CUSTOMER
232
76 THEFT OF SERVICE
234
77 CHARGED PARTY
236
772 Charging for Access
237
78 CHARGING FOR NETWORKINTEGRATED SERVICES
238
782 Presence
241
783 LocationBased Services
242
79 CONCLUSION
243
Standardized Charging Models and Protocols
245
811 OffLine Charging Architecture
247
812 OnLine Charging Architecture
253
813 CAP Interface
258
815 Release 6
259
821 RADIUS
260
822 Diameter
262
823 Relationship to 3GPP
267
832 ContentBased Charging API
269
833 Relationship to 3GPP
270
842 Relationship to 3GPP
272
852 The NDMU Protocol
274
86 CONCLUSION
275
Security
277
91 GENERAL THREAT ANALYSIS
278
912 Threat Classification
280
92 SECURITY SOLUTIONS
282
921 Data Protection
283
923 Firewalls and Network Address Translator
284
924 Intrusion Detection Systems and Honey Pots
285
931 IP Backbone MPLS and Security
286
932 IPsec
287
933 Secure Socket Layer and Transport Layer Security
288
934 Secured Shell
289
95 SIGNALING SECURITY ISSUES
291
951 Interactions with SCTP
292
953 Electronic Serial Number Mobile Identification Number and IMSI
293
96 MOBILE SECURITY ARCHITECTURE
294
961 IMS Security Considerations
295
97 WLAN SECURITY
296
98 VIRUSES TROJANS AND WORMS
297
References
298
Conclusion
299
List of Acronyms and Abbreviations
303
About the Authors
311
Index
313
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