41 Active Learning Strategies for the Inclusive Classroom, Grades 6 12

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Corwin Press, Jun 27, 2012 - Education - 207 pages
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Motivating adolescents to learn can be a challenge! Often distracted and easily bored, these kids are also critical thinkers capable of thriving in the classroom while learning 21st century skills. How do we hold their attention and develop their abilities?

Research shows that all students--regardless of learning style, disability category, or language difference--learn more effectively when they are engaged in active learning. 41 Active Learning Strategies for the Inclusive Classroom shows teachers how to help all students achieve positive learning outcomes. The authors provide a compilation of strategies that serve as blueprints for instructional design and directions for using them across a variety of content areas. The many benefits of active learning include:

A more engaged and interactive classroom

Increased self-directed learning

Development of higher-order thinking skills such as analysis, synthesis, evaluation

Improved reading, discussion, and writing competencies

Each strategy includes materials, directions, sample applications across content areas, ways to support students with learning differences, and sample vignettes. New teacher requirements and raised expectations to meet higher standards for all students might make the teaching challenge look daunting. The authors understand your journey, and will walk you through the process step-by-step so that you are fully prepared to achieve success!

 

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Contents

INCLUSION AT THE SECONDARY LEVEL
1
Definition and Research
3
Who Are We Teaching?
4
Helping Teachers Meet the Inclusion Challenge
5
What Is Active Learning?
6
BrainBased Learning and the Adolescent Learner
7
Information Processing
8
Connections to Differentiated Instruction
10
8 CONCEPT CLARIFICATION The class works as a whole to describe and discuss abstract concepts within a teacherdirected structure
72
9 EXIT CARDS Endoflesson questions or comments identify student progress or process
78
10 FACE PLACE Students create and share Facebook pages related to learning topics and determine who they would friend among their peers
81
11 FRAMEWORK This simple yet effective strategy involves using an outline or graphic organizer to help keep students focused on key content thr...
85
12 INFORMATION RINGS Construct connected flashcards of data
90
13 INVENTION CONVENTION With the unit of study providing the context students design inventions to meet a perceived need
93
14 JIGSAW This cooperative learning experience helps students share information in and among groups
98
15 LINKEDIN Students share and defend like opinions about a topic with a visual
101

Supporting State Standards and Assessments
11
Motivating Learners With Active Learning Strategies
12
The Critical Need to Address Diverse Student Populations
14
The Beginning
15
Summary
16
ACTIVE LEARNING STRATEGIES IN THE MIDDLE SCHOOL AND HIGH SCHOOL DEBUNKING THE MYTH
17
Frequently Asked Questions
18
Reflect on the Experience
21
SELECTING AND IMPLEMENTING ACTIVE LEARNING STRATEGIES FOR THE INCLUSIVE CLASSROOM
23
Other Diverse Populations
25
Assessing Students and Indentifying Learning Characteristics
26
Before During and After
27
Learner Characteristics Described
31
Low Experiential Base
32
Language Needs
33
Learner Considerations
34
Summary
35
GROUPING FOR INSTRUCTION WHO GOES WHERE WITH WHOM TO DO WHAT
39
Whole Group Instruction
40
Small Group Instruction
41
And Now Drum Roll Please The Strategies
46
ACTIVE LEARNING STRATEGIES
47
1 ARTIFACT REVEAL Students create artifacts related to learning concepts
48
2 BALL TOSS The game of catch facilitates QA
51
3 BAROMETER Students take stands on controversial issues by voting with their feet
54
4 BOARD QUIZ The whole class works collaboratively on quiz questions
58
5 BODY LANGUAGE Movementbased instruction involves using the body to represent the content students are learning about
61
6 BUILDING AN EXPERIENCE The teacher creates an occurrence so that students can experience the content in order to better facilitate understandi...
65
7 BULLETIN BLOG The class uses a bulletin board to blog information comments and perspectives
69
16 LISTENING TEAMS Each group is given one question or issue to report on after a lecture or other direct instruction
104
17 NEXT Students take turns reconstructing information from assignments
107
18 PHILOSOPHICAL CHAIRS Students sit in lines opposite one another sharing perspectives from their topic or points of view
110
19 PHOTO FINISH Students use deductive reasoning to determine the circumstances that led up to a conclusion that is presented in a visual represent...
113
20 PLAYLIST Students work in groups to create a playlist that reflects the key themes of the content to be covered
117
21 PUZZLE PIECES Students walk around the room with QA cards to find matches
121
22 READING DISCUSSION CARDS This strategy provides the opportunity for students to discuss what they read informally but with an existing str...
124
23 RESEARCH SCAVENGERS Students research information using a variety of resources
127
24 ROUND ROBIN Students participate in group rotations responding to a topic or question
133
25 SELFREPORTING Students selfcheck progress and create action plans
136
26 SPIDERWEB The class stands in a circle and uses a ball of yarn to create a spiderweb while responding to a statement or question
141
27 TEACHERTEACHER Students use a reciprocal teaching approach to review learning planning and teaching lessons to peers
144
28 TEXT MESSAGE Students write texts to one another assuming the roles of people they are learning about
148
29 THEME BOARDS Students work in small groups to explore the underlying themes or key ideas in a given unit of study and create poster boards t...
152
30 THROUGH OUR OWN LENS As part of a unit of study students work individually to examine or research the topic in a way that helps it relate to...
155
31 TRAVELING TEAMS Students physically rotate through groups sharing information with one another
159
32 TRUE OR FALSE Students determine the authenticity of given statements based on their readings
163
33 WANTED POSTER Students create wanted posters describing figures they are learning about and offer clever rewards
169
34 WE INTERVIEW During the lesson students contribute relevant information based on what they learned during prior interviews with relevant ind...
173
35 WHAT WOULD THEY SAY? This strategy directs students to use their knowledge of a given topic book or era in history to think up phrases that...
177
36 THE WHIP The teacher poses a question and then whips around the room giving each student a chance to respond in order if he or she so chooses
181
37 WHY AND BECAUSE Students use graphic organizers during a contentintensive lesson to make meaningful connections between key points
183
38 WORD BY WORD Students review their notes and sum up a topic in one single word the word that they feel symbolizes the essence of the story t...
188
39 WORD CLOUD Students use a website to create a visual that symbolizes significant themes or occurrences related to a topic
195
40 ZIPIT ALSO KNOWN AS BAGGIE STORIES After reading an assignment or learning new content students work in small groups to write up and...
199
41 ClOSURE This presents a number of ways to help students reinforce key concepts help organize student thinking and relate new content to prior k...
203
REFERENCES
205
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About the author (2012)

Dr. Diane Casale-Giannola is currently an Associate Professor in the School of Education at Rider University. She received her Master's of Science, specializing in Special Education, from Albany University and her Ph.D. from New York University. She also holds an Advanced Certificate in Educational Supervision and Administration from Brooklyn College. She is an active researcher, presenter, and consultant, focusing on how to assess and address the needs of diverse student populations. She is an active member of the New Jersey Council for Exceptional Children and Council of Exceptional Children,, including participating in the CEC scholarship committee and sponsoring the first state-wide Student CEC professional conference.

Dr. Green has a B.A. in English from University of Bridgeport, an M.A. in Special Eduation and Reading from Eastern New Mexico University, and a Ph.D. in Psychological & Cultural Studies and Special Education from University of Nebraska at Lincoln. She holds certifications in Special Education and Teacher of English and is currently an Associate Professor of Education at Centenary College. She is a member of the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) and the Teacher Education Division of CEC.

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