42 Rules for Applying Google Analytics

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Happy About, 2012 - Business & Economics - 122 pages
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"42 Rules for Applying Google Analytics" is understanding a visitor's journey through your website then applying that measurement, collection and analysis of data for the main purpose of adequately optimizing and improving website performance. This includes learning where your visitors come from and how they interact with your site or measuring key drivers and conversions such as which web pages encourage people to react by calling, emailing or purchasing a product.

The benefit of applying this free knowledge, whether you are an advertiser, publisher, or site owner, will help you write better ads, strengthen your marketing initiatives, and create higher-converting web pages.

It is even more imperative to apply analytics now that online advertising channels have evolved from traditional display and text to mobile, video and social networking. If you are to succeed, it is a must and not an option to align metrics with business goals, draw actionable conclusions and articulate metrics and goals to stakeholders.

 

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Contents

Foreword by Michael BLehmann
1
Introduction
3
Rules Are Meant to Be Broken
4
Preparation What You Need to Know before You Begin
6
Monitoring What You Need to Focus on to Make Decisions
24
Reporting How to Get the Information You Need
40
Reading Specific Action Steps to Help You Optimize the Data
62
What Now? What to Do with the Data Now That You Have It
80
Glossary
98
Resources
100
About the Author
102
Write Your Own Rules
104
Other Happy About Books
106
A Message From Super Star Press
108
Back Cover
109
Copyright

These Are My Rules What Are Yours?
96

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About the author (2012)

Head of English at a local secondary school, Rob Sanders is a freelance writer whose first fiction was published in "Inferno!" magazine. He lives off the beaten track in the small city of Lincoln, England.

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