A Berlin Republic: Writings on Germany

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U of Nebraska Press, 1997 - History - 187 pages
A Berlin Republic (Die NormalitÜt einer Berliner Republik) brings together writings on the new, united Germany by one of that country?s most original and trenchant commentators, J_rgen Habermas. Among other topics, Habermas addresses the consequences of German history, the challenges and perils of the post-Wall era, and Germany?s place in contemporary Europe. ø Here, as in his earlier Past as Future, Habermas emerges as an inspired analyst of contemporary German political and intellectual life. He repeatedly criticizes recent efforts by historians and political commentators to ?normalize? and, in part, to understate the horrors of modern German history. He insists that 1945?not 1989?was the crucial turning point in German history, since it was then that West Germany decisively repudiated certain aspects of its cultural and political past (nationalism and anti-Semitism in particular) and turned toward Western traditions of democracy, free and open discussion, and respect for the civil rights of all individuals. Similarly, Habermas deplores the renewal of nationalist sentiment in Germany and throughout Europe. Drawing upon his vast historical knowledge and contemporary insight, Habermas argues for heightened emphasis on trans-European and global democratic institutions?institutions far better suited to meet the challenges (and dangers) of the next century.
 

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Contents

Preface
1
What Does Working Off the Past Mean
17
Replies to Questions from a Bundestag
41
GERMAN UN CERTAINTIES
59
Carl Schmitt in the Political Intellectual
107
BET weeN FACTS AND NORMs
131
On
161
Index
183
Copyright

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About the author (1997)

J_rgen Habermas is one of the best-known and most influential philosophers in Europe today. Steven Rendall is a professor in the Department of Romance Languages at the University of Oregon. He is the author of Distinguo: Reading Montaigne Differently and the translator of Marlis Steinert?s Hitler. Peter Uwe Hohendahl, Jacob Gould Schurman Professor of German and Comparative Literature at Cornell University, is the author of Building a National Literature: The Case of Germany, 1830?1870 and the editor of A History of German Literary Criticism, 1730?1980 (Nebraska 1988).

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