A Bibliographical History of the Study and Use of Color from Aristotle to Kandinsky

Front Cover
Edwin Mellen Press, Jan 1, 2005 - Art - 398 pages
0 Reviews
The history of color harmony meaning is traced from Aristotle through Kandinsky, to Modern and Postmodern ideas. Discussed are the important contributions to color theory of Alberti, da Vinci, Rubens, Descartes, LeBlon, Hogarth, and Delacoioix, to name a few. Chapters are included on the systematic color analyses of Newton, Goethe, and Chevreul, as well as those of Schopenhauer, Young, Brewster, and Runge; the groundbreaking color-vision research of Helmholtz and the notable scientific studies of Fechner and Rood; the influence of scientific color on such artists as Seurat; and the color organization theories of Moses Harris, Munsell, and Ostwald. Coverage is given to the psychology of affective response, including, among others, Wundt, Allesch, Kirschman, Birkoff, Katz, Arnheim, and Ehrenzweig. Color education is explored through such 20th century teachers as Itten, Katz, Albers, Pope, Sargent, Henri, and many more.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Classical Color Harmony
9
Delacroix the Artist
22
The Subjective Idea
33
Copyright

25 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2005)

Kenneth E. Burchett teaches Color Theory at the University of Central Arkansas, where he previously served as Chair of the Department of Art.

Bibliographic information