A Brig of War

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Sheridan House, Inc., 2001 - Fiction - 233 pages
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In A Brig of War, Nathaniel Drinkwater is promoted lieutenant of the brig Hellebore. He finds routine convoy escort duties end abruptly when Admiral Nelson, pursuing the French fleet to Egypt, sends Hellebore to the Red Sea with an urgent warning to the British squadron there. However, Nelson's apprehensions over French ambitions in the East are more than justified. Edouard Santhonax, Drinkwater's old enemy, is already preparing for a French descent on India.
The hunt for this elusive Frenchman and his frigate is combined with British naval operations on the flank of Napoleon's Egyptian campaign. It is during the attack on Kosseir that Drinkwater is left for dead. His escape and the subsequent desperate attack on Santhonax leads to a still more dangerous situation under Augustus Morris, former tyrant of the midshipmen's berth on HMS Cyclops.
Drinkwater's fight to bring a half-armed ship safely to the cape of Good Hope is beset with personal enmity, the activity of the French and the violence of the sea.
 

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User Review  - rsstick - LibraryThing

In A Brig of War, Richard Woodman has hit his stride as an author. The rough edges of the first novel in the series have been smoothed in this accomplished second installment. Read full review

Contents

Paris
1
The Convoy Escort
5
Nelson
13
A Brig of War
23
Shadows of Clouds
33
The Mistress Shore
42
The Cape of Storms
60
Vanderdeckens Curse
68
YMorCoch
137
The Will of Allah
145
Santhonax
152
The Price of Admiralty
165
A Conspiracy of Circumstances
170
Morris
180
A Womans Touch
191
The Fortune of War
196

A John Company Man
84
Mocha Road
90
Winging the Eagle
104
Kosseir Bay
117
A Stink of Fish
131
A Matter of Luck
208
The Cape of Good Hope
216
Authors Note
233
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Richard Woodman was born in London. England in 1944. He became an indentured midshipman in cargo liners at the age of 16, which resulted in a 37 year nautical career. He became captain in 1980. He spent 11 years in command at sea, 6 years in operational management ashore, and is currently a Board Member of Trinity House, the authority responsible for navigational safety round the coast. He is a regular correspondent for the shipping newspaper Lloyd's List. He has written over 50 books, a mixture of fiction and maritime history. His fiction works include the Nathaniel Drinkwater series, A Kit Faulkner Naval Adventure series, and The William Kite Trilogy. He received several awards including the Desmond Wettern Maritime Media Award in 2001 for his journalism, the Society of Nautical Research's Anderson Medal in 2005 for three major studies of convoy operations in the Second World War, and the Marine Society's Thomas Gray Medal in 2010 for his five-volume history of the British Merchant Navy.

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