A British Rifle Man: The Journals and Correspondence of Major George Simmons, Rifle Brigade, During the Peninsular War and the Campaign of Waterloo

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A. & C. Black, 1899 - Peninsular War, 1807-1814 - 386 pages
 

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Page 379 - Pemberton and Manners with a shot each in the knee, making them as stiff as the other's tree one - Loftus Gray with a gash in the lip, and minus a portion of one heel, which made him march to the tune of dot and go one - Smith with a shot in the ankle - Eeles minus a thumb - Johnston, in addition to other shot holes, a stiff elbow, which deprived him of the power of disturbing his friends as a scratcher of Scotch reels upon the violin - Percival with a shot through his lungs. Hope with a grape-shot...
Page xix - Nothing could exceed the manner in which the ninetyfifth set about the business. . . . Certainly I never saw such skirmishers as the ninety-fifth, now the rifle brigade. They could do the work much better and with infinitely less loss than any other of our best light troops. They possessed an individual boldness, a mutual understanding, and a quickness of eye, in taking advantage of the ground, which, taken all together, I never saw equalled.
Page xix - Our rifles were immediately sent to dislodge the French from the hills on our left, and our battalion was ordered to support them. Nothing could exceed the manner in which the ninety-fifth set about the business Certainly I never saw such skirmishers as the ninety-fifth, now the rifle brigade. They could do the work much better and with infinitely less loss than any other of our best light troops. They possessed an individual boldness, a mutual understanding, and a quickness...
Page 332 - Yet those Veterans had won nineteen pitched battles, and innumerable combats ; had made or sustained ten sieges and taken four great fortresses; had twice expelled the French from Portugal, once from Spain ; had penetrated France, and killed, wounded, or captured two hundred thousand enemies — leaving of their own number, forty thousand dead, whose bones, whiten the plains and mountains of the Peninsula.
Page xxiv - O'Hare of the 95th, who perished on the breach at the head of the stormers, and with him nearly all the volunteers for that desperate service?
Page xxiv - Who shall describe the springing valour of that Portuguese grenadier who was killed the foremost man at the Santa Maria ! or the martial fury of that desperate rifleman, who, in his resolution to win, thrust himself beneath the chained sword-blades, and then suffered the enemy to dash his head to pieces with the ends of their muskets...
Page xxiv - About six hundred men and officers fell in the escalade of San Vincente; as many at the castle ; and more than two thousand at the breaches, each division there losing twelve hundred. And how deadly the strife was at that point may be gathered from this — the forty-third and fifty-second...
Page 3 - Indignant at this shameful scene, the troops hastened rather than slackened the impetuosity of their pace, and leaving only seventeen stragglers behind, in twenty-six hours crossed the field of battle in a close and compact body ; having in that time passed over sixty-two English miles in the hottest season of the year, each man carrying from fifty to sixty pounds
Page xix - They could do the work much better and with infinitely less loss than any other of our best light troops. They possessed an individual boldness, a mutual understanding, and a quickness of eye in taking advantage of the ground, which, taken altogether, I never saw equalled. They were, in fact, as much superior to the French voltigeurs, as the latter were to our skirmishers in general. As our regiment was often employed in supporting them, I think 1 am fairly qualified to speak of their merits.
Page 379 - ... and minus a portion of one heel, which made him march to the tune of dot and go one — Smith with a shot in the ankle — Eeles minus a thumb — Johnston, in addition to other shot holes, a stiff elbow, which deprived him of the power of disturbing his friends as a scratcher of Scotch reels upon the violin — Percival with a shot through his lungs. Hope with a grape-shot lacerated leg — and George Simmons with his riddled body held together by a pair of stays...

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