A Call To Arms: (Matthew Hervey 4)

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Random House, Apr 27, 2010 - Fiction - 384 pages
1 Review

India 1819

Matthew Hervey is charged with raising a new troop, and organising transport for India - for he, his men and their horses are to set sail with immediate effect.

What Hervey and his greenhorn soldiers cannot know is that in India they will face a trial for which they are ill prepared. A large number of Burmese war-boats are assembled near Chittagong, and the only way to thwart their advance involves a hazardous march through the jungle.Soon Hervey and his troop are in the midst of hot and bloody action once again...

'The book picks up a pace that mirrors a cavalry charge ...Hervey continues to grow in stature, while Mallinson himself continues to delight.' Observer

 

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There is a very slow pace to this book and not much action in the major portion of it until right at the end. However it is about the man and his journey so it is to be expected. The reward is the detail of how a cavalry regiment conducts itself in the colonial period, in particular its recruitment, training, transport to foreign lands, acclimatisation, the reactions to the politics of the region and short sharp actions thereof. 

Contents

FOREWORD
9
ENGLAND
15
PARADISE OF EXILES
22
Wi HAPPY RETURNS
114
ROUGHRIDERS
210
NUMBER ONE LoNdoN
218
INDIA
237
CASUS BELLI
329
Copyright

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About the author (2010)

At seventeen, Allan Mallinson gave up the promise of an exhibition at Brasenose College, Oxford to go instead to theological college. After three years he decided to take a break in training with a short-service commission in the army. He served with the infantry worldwide, and then, on deciding to make the army a career, transferred to the cavalry.
He began writing while still serving – first, a history of the antecedent regiments of that which he commanded, and then the Matthew Hervey series of novels chronicling the life of a fictitious cavalry officer before and after Waterloo. He left the army in 2004 as a brigadier to write full time, including defence comment for the Daily Telegraph and then The Times.
In 2009 his The Making of the British Army, a survey of the army’s history and development since 1660, was shortlisted for several prizes and chosen by Jeremy Paxman for the Observer’s ‘Books of the Year’. An updated edition, with a commentary on the Strategic Defence and Security Review, was published in 2011.
His centenary history, 1914: Fight the Good Fight – Britain, the Army and the Coming of the First World War was shortlisted for the Westminster Medal and won the Army Book of the Year Award 2013. Its sequel, Too Important for the Generals, examines the failure of Allied generals and politicians to find a less bloody strategy for victory in the First World War and will be published in June 2016.

Allan Mallinson lives with his wife, Sue, a dressage trainer, on Salisbury Plain.

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