A Casebook of Family Interventions for Psychosis

Front Cover
Fiona Lobban, Christine Barrowclough
John Wiley and Sons, Sep 28, 2009 - Psychology - 396 pages
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A practical guide to implementing family interventions for psychosis, which discusses different family needs and illustrates different approaches to offering the interventions.
  • Approximately 1 in 100 people experience psychosis, which can severely disrupt home and family life and place a heavy burden on carers
  • A practical guide to implementing family interventions for psychosis, which discusses different family needs and illustrates different approaches to offering the interventions
  • Shows how to tailor family interventions to meet different needs e.g. working via interpreter or with families in which multiple members suffer mental health problems
  • No direct competition on family interventions for psychosis.
 

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Contents

FIRST EPISODE PSYCHOSIS
21
Working with Families to Prevent Relapse
67
INTERVENTIONS FOCUSING ON DRUG USE
91
Contents
108
Family Motivational Intervention in Early Psychosis
117
Maarten Smeerdijk Don Linszen Tom Kuipers and ReneKeet IV VARIETY OFISSUESARISING IN WORKING
139
Coming to Terms with Mental Illness in
167
Interventions with Siblings
185
WORKING IN DIFFERENT CONTEXTS
233
Meeting the Needs of Families on Inpatient Units
259
SERVICE RELATED ISSUES
285
Overcoming Barriers to Staff Offering Family Interventions
309
RELATIVESSUPPORTING EACH OTHER
337
CONCLUSION
355
Index
369
Copyright

Family Intervention with Ethnically and Culturally
211

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About the author (2009)

Dr Fiona Lobban is a Senior Lecturer in Clinical Psychology at the Spectrum Centre for Mental Health Research at Lancaster University in the North West of England. She also works as a Consultant Clinical Psychologist supporting family work in the Early Intervention Service for Psychosis in Lancashire care NHS Trust.

Professor Christine Barrowclough is Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Manchester, UK, and has been engaged in research and clinical work with families of people with psychosis for many years.

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