A Century of British Geography

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OUP/British Academy, Sep 11, 2003 - Science - 674 pages
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These essays trace the evolution of British geography as an academic discipline during the last hundred years, and stress how the study of the world we live in is fundamental to an understanding of its problems and concerns. Never before has such an ambitious and wide-ranging review been attempted, and never before has it been done with so much knowledge and passion. The principal themes covered in this volume are those of environment, place and space, and the applied geography of map-making and planning. The volume also addresses specific issues such as disease, urbanization, regional viability, and ethics and social problems. This lively and accessible work offers many insights into the minds and practices of today's geographers.
 

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Contents

an imprecise review
11
The institutionalisation of geography as
45
Physical geography and geography as an environmental science
93
humans and environments
137
The creation of humanised landscapes
167
People and the contemporary environment
213
Place
247
The passion of place
275
The geographical underpinning of society
429
Geography applied
463
Geographers and environmental change
505
The geography of disease distributions
521
Geographers and the urban century
545
Geographers and the fragmented city
563
Geographers and the regional problem
583
feminist contributions
603

Space
303
Global national and local
347
maps and mapping
371
Geographers ethics and social concern
625
Index
643
Copyright

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About the author (2003)

Ron Johnston is a Professor of Geography, University of Bristol; Fellow of the British Academy. Michael Williams is a Professor of Geography, University of Oxford; Fellow of the British Academy.

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