A Certain Finkelmeyer

Front Cover
Northwestern University Press, 1995 - Fiction - 362 pages
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Aaron-Chaim Mendelevich Finkelmeyer is a Jew and a poet who works for the Ministries of Fisheries in Siberia. Because of his heritage, the only way he can get his work published is to "discover" the oral literature of an obscure minority population, the Tongors, which he publishes under the guise of a translation. This comic masquerade turns serious when his work gets the attention of the KGB, and when a Siberian hunter, the owner of the name Finkelmeyer uses as a pseudonym, appears to take his revenge.
 

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A CERTAIN FINKELMEYER

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

A hopelessly self-effacing Russian Jew writes glorious poems under the Khrushchev regime but imprudently neglects the official steps to make a name for himself as a poet—an obvious parable for the ... Read full review

A certain Finkelmeyer

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

This highly original novel by a Soviet author residing here portrays the life and loves of Aaron Finkelmeyer, an introspective Jewish poet. Rejected for admission to his chosen university because of ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
5
Section 2
9
Section 3
26
Section 4
32
Section 5
71
Section 6
81
Section 7
92
Section 8
98
Section 16
192
Section 17
201
Section 18
203
Section 19
211
Section 20
227
Section 21
234
Section 22
258
Section 23
267

Section 9
119
Section 10
139
Section 11
154
Section 12
158
Section 13
163
Section 14
170
Section 15
185
Section 24
281
Section 25
293
Section 26
298
Section 27
337
Section 28
355
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Felix Roziner was born in Russia and emigrated to Israel in 1978. In addition to fiction, he has published poetry, screenplays, books on art history, and music criticism.

Michael Henry Heim (1943-2012) was a Professor of Slavic Languages, at the University California at Los Angeles (UCLA). He received his doctorate at Harvard in 1971. He is an active and prolific translator, and is fluent in Czech, French, German, Italian, Russian, and Serbo-Croatian.

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