A Christmas Carol & Two Other Christmas Books

Front Cover
Collector's Library, 2004 - Fiction - 364 pages
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Many Christmas stories have been written through the years, but none has become as much a part of the holiday landscape as A Christmas Carol? or produced a character to match the extraordinary Ebenezer Scrooge. His terrifying encounters with the spirits of Christmases Past, Present, and Future, and the amazing transformation he undergoes during that one evening, has the power to melt the hardest heart. Dickens' inspiring and popular tale of redemption is a delight to read again and again. The world's greatest works of literature are now available in these beautiful keepsake volumes. Bound in real cloth, and featuring gilt edges and ribbon markers, these beautifully produced books are a wonderful way to build a handsome library of classic literature. These are the essential novels that belong in every home. They'll transport readers to imaginary worlds and provide excitement, entertainment, and enlightenment for years to come. All of these novels feature attractive illustrations and have an unequalled period feel that will grace the library, the bedside table or bureau.
 

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Contents

Authors Preface to the First Christmas Book
Marleys Ghost
ii
The First of the Three Spirits
36
The Second of the Three Spirits
59
The Last of the Spirits
89
The End of It
109
THE CHIMES
119
First Quarter
121
Third Quarter
180
Fourth Quarter
208
THE CRICKET ON THE HEARTH
235
Chirp the First
239
Chirp the Second
274
Chirp the Third
314
Afterword
355
Further Reading
363

Second Quarter
152

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About the author (2004)

One of the grand masters of Victorian literature, Charles Dickens was born on February 7, 1812, in Landport, Portsea, England. He died in Kent on June 9, 1870. The second of eight children of a family continually plagued by debt, the young Dickens came to know not only hunger and privation,but also the horror of the infamous debtors' prison and the evils of child labor. A turn of fortune in the shape of a legacy brought release from the nightmare of prison and "slave" factories and afforded Dickens the opportunity of two years' formal schooling at Wellington House Academy. He worked as an attorney's clerk and newspaper reporter until his Sketches by Boz (1836) and The Pickwick Papers (1837) brought him the amazing and instant success that was to be his for the remainder of his life. In later years, the pressure of serial writing, editorial duties, lectures, and social commitments led to his separation from Catherine Hogarth after twenty-three years of marriage. It also hastened his death at the age of fifty-eight, when he was characteristically engaged in a multitude of work.

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