A Collection of Beatrix Potter Stories: Easyread Edition

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ReadHowYouWant.com, Oct 1, 2006 - Fiction - 152 pages
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This is Beatrix Potter true English Classic for children All of the stories have a subtle educative moral. Disobedient children are punished in some books but this does not mean they are dark stories. Infact her stories are so light the children can not get oppressed. All the characters are full of life, love and portray great imaginative fun....
 

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Contents

THE TALE OF PETER RABBIT
1
THE TALE OF THE FLOPSY BUNNIES
14
THE TALE OF MR TOD
36
THE TALE OF MRS TIGGYWINKLE 62 THE TALE OF GINGER PICKLES
70
THE TALE OF TIMMY TIPTOES
84
THE TALE OF JEMIMA PUDDLEDUCK 110 THE TALE OF PIGLING BLAND
118
THE TALE OF TWO BAD MICE
138
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Page 1 - Now, my dears," said old Mrs. Rabbit, one morning, "you may go into the fields or down the lane, but don't go into Mr. McGregor's garden; your father had an accident there; he was put in a pie by Mrs. McGregor.
Page 3 - It would have been a beautiful thing to hide in, if it had not had so much water in it. MR. McGREGOR was quite sure that Peter was somewhere in the toolshed, perhaps hidden underneath a flowerpot. He began to turn them over carefully, looking under each. Presently Peter sneezed"Kertyschoo!
Page 2 - Flopsy, Mopsy, and Cotton-tail, who were good little bunnies, went down the lane to gather blackberries ; but Peter, who was very naughty, ran straight away to Mr. McGregor's garden, and squeezed under the gate...
Page 4 - Presently, he came to a pond where Mr. McGregor filled his water-cans. A white cat was staring at some gold-fish, she sat very, very still, but now and then the tip of her tail twitched as if it were alive. Peter thought it best to go away without speaking to her; he had heard about cats from his cousin, little Benjamin Bunny. He went back towards the tool-shed, but suddenly, quite close to him, he heard the noise of a hoe — scr-r-ritch, scratch, scratch, scritch.
Page 5 - Mr. McGregor hung up the little jacket and the shoes for a scarecrow to frighten the blackbirds. Peter never stopped running or looked behind him till he got home to the big fir-tree. He was so tired that he flopped down upon the nice soft sand on the floor of the rabbit-hole, and shut his eyes. His mother was busy cooking; she wondered what he had done with his clothes. It was the second little jacket and pair of shoes that Peter had lost in a fortnight!
Page 5 - I AM sorry to say that Peter was not very well during the evening. His mother put him to bed, and made some camomile tea; and she gave a dose of it to Peter! "One table-spoonful to be taken at bed-time.

About the author (2006)

(Helen) Beatrix Potter, 1866 - 1943 (Helen) Beatrix Potter was born in 1866 in London where she was privately educated. During most of her adult life, she lived in a farm cottage in Sawrey, Westmoreland County. She was unsuccessful in trying to publish her serious botanical work, watercolor studies of fungi, but she wrote and privately published "The Tale of Peter Rabbit" for an invalid child in 1900. This story became a children's classic throughout the world. Other animal characters created by her include, Benjamin Bunny, Jemima Puddle-Duck, and Mrs. Tiggy-Winkle. Her tales are illustrated by her own hand in delicate and detailed watercolor pictures depicting her characters. Potter's other works include "The Tailor of Gloucester" published in 1902 and "The Tale of Tom Kitten" published in 1907. At her death in 1943, she bequeathed her property in Sawrey to the National Trust, which also maintains her home as a museum.

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