A Combinatorial Theory of Possibility

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Cambridge University Press, Sep 29, 1989 - Philosophy - 156 pages
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David Armstrong's book is a contribution to the philosophical discussion about possible worlds. Taking Wittgenstein's Tractatus as his point of departure, Professor Armstrong argues that nonactual possibilities and possible worlds are recombinations of actually existing elements, and as such are useful fictions. There is an extended criticism of the alternative-possible-worlds approach championed by the American philosopher David Lewis. This major work will be read with interest by a wide range of philosophers.
 

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Contents

The causal argument
3
NonNaturalist theories of possibility
14
A COMBINATORIAL AND NATURALIST ACCOUNT OF POSSIBILITY
35
Possibility in a simple world
37
Expanding and contracting the world
54
Relative atoms
66
Are there de re incompatibilities and necessities?
77
Higherorder entities negation and causation
87
Supervenience
103
Mathematics
119
Final questions logic
138
Works cited
141
Tractarian Nominalism
145
Index
153
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