A Companion to American Indian History

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Philip J. Deloria, Neal Salisbury
John Wiley & Sons, Mar 12, 2004 - History - 513 pages
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A Companion to American Indian History captures the thematic breadth of Native American history. Twenty-five original essays written by leading scholars, both American Indian and non-American Indian, bring a comprehensive perspective to a history that in the past has been related exclusively by Euro-Americans.

The essays cover a wide range of Indian experiences and practices, including contacts with non-Indians, religion, family, economy, law, education, gender, and culture. They reflect new approaches to Native America drawn from environmental, comparative, and gender history in their exploration of compelling questions regarding performance, identity, cultural brokerage, race and blood, captivity, adoption, and slavery. Each chapter also encourages further reading by including a carefully selected bibliography.

Intended for students, scholars, and general readers of American Indian history, this timely book is the ideal guide to current and future research.

 

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Contents

Creating Value and Sharing Beauty
209
Native American Literatures
234
More Histories of Indian Identity
248
Labor and Exchange in American Indian History
269
Indians Americans and
287
Gender in Native America
307
Metis Mestizo and MixedBlood
321
Captivity Adoption and
339
Translation and Cultural Brokerage
357
Federal and State Policies and American Indians
379
Native Americans and the United States Canada and Mexico
397
by Indians versus for Indians
422
Native People and the Law
441
Sovereignty
460
Bibliography
475
Index
495

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About the author (2004)

Philip J. Deloria is an Associate Professor in the Department of History and the Program in American Culture at the University of Michigan. A member of a prominent Dakota family, he received his PhD from Yale University in 1994. In addition to numerous articles and essays, he is the author of Playing Indian (1998).

Neal Salisbury is Professor of History at Smith College. He is the author of Manitou and Providence: Indians, Europeans, and the Making of New England (1982), and co-author of The Enduring Vision: A History of the American People (fourth edition, 2000).

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