A Companion to Old Norse-Icelandic Literature and Culture

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Rory McTurk
John Wiley & Sons, Mar 11, 2008 - Literary Criticism - 548 pages
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This major survey of Old Norse-Icelandic literature and culture demonstrates the remarkable continuity of Icelandic language and culture from medieval to modern times.

  • Comprises 29 chapters written by leading scholars in the field
  • Reflects current debates among Old Norse-Icelandic scholars
  • Pays attention to previously neglected areas of study, such as the sagas of Icelandic bishops and the fantasy sagas
  • Looks at the ways Old Norse-Icelandic literature is used by modern writers, artists and film directors, both within and outside Scandinavia
  • Sets Old Norse-Icelandic language and literature in its wider cultural context
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 Archaeology of Economy and Society
7
2 Christian Biography
27
3 Christian Poetry
43
4 Continuity? The Icelandic Sagas in PostMedieval Times
64
5 Eddic Poetry
82
6 Family Sagas
101
7 Geography and Travel
119
16 Orality and Literacy in the Sagas of Icelanders
285
17 Pagan Myth and Religion
302
18 The PostMedieval Reception of Old Norse and Old Icelandic Literature
320
19 Prose of Christian Instruction
338
20 Rhetoric and Style
354
21 Romance Translated riddarasögur
372
22 Royal Biography
388
23 Runes
403

8 Historical Background Iceland 8701400
136
9 Historiography and PseudoHistory
155
10 Language
173
11 Late Prose Fiction lygisögur
190
12 Late Secular Poetry
205
13 Laws
223
14 Manuscripts and Palaeography
245
15 Metre and Metrics
265
24 Sagas of Contemporary History Sturlunga saga Texts and Research
427
25 Sagas of Icelandic Prehistory fornaldarsögur
447
26 Short Prose Narrative þáttr
462
27 Skaldic Poetry
479
28 Social Institutions
503
29 Women in Old Norse Poetry and Sagas
518
Index
536
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About the author (2008)

Rory McTurk is Professor of Icelandic Studies at the University of Leeds. Previously he has taught at the Universities of Lund and Copenhagen and at University College, Dublin. He is the author of Studies in Ragnars saga loðbrókar and its Major Scandinavian Analogues (1991) and Chaucer and the Norse and Celtic Worlds (2005), and has translated Kormáks saga for the Penguin Sagas of Warrior-Poets (2002).

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