A Companion to the London Museum and Pantherion: Containing a Brief Description of Upwards of Fifteen Thousand Natural and Foreign Curiosities, Antiquities ... Now Open for Public Inspection in the Egyptian Temple, Picadilly, London

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proprietor, 1813 - Natural history - 151 pages
 

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Page 88 - See through this air, this ocean, and this earth, All matter quick, and bursting into birth! Above, how high progressive life may go ! Around, how wide ! how deep extend below ! Vast chain of being! which from God began; Natures ethereal, human, angel, man, Beast, bird, fish, insect, what no eye can see, No glass can reach; from infinite to thee; From thee to nothing...
Page 106 - Through subterranean cells, Where searching sun-beams scarce can find a way, Earth animated heaves. The flowery leaf Wants not its soft inhabitants.
Page 103 - Which strike ev'n eyes incurious ; but each moss, Each shell, each crawling insect, holds a rank, Important in the plan of Him who framed This scale of beings; holds a rank which lost Would break the chain, and leave behind a gap Which nature's self would rue.
Page 78 - But should he hide his face, the astonish'd sun, And all the extinguish'd stars, would, loosening, reel Wide from their spheres, and Chaos come again. And yet was every faltering tongue of man, Almighty Father ! silent in Thy praise, Thy works themselves would raise a general voice, Even in the depth of solitary woods By human foot untrod ; proclaim Thy power, And to the choir celestial Thee resound, The eternal Cause, Support, and End of all...
Page 109 - These are thy glorious Works, Parent of good, Almighty! thine this universal frame, Thus wondrous fair: thyself how wondrous then, Unspeakable! who sitt'st above these heavens To us invisible, or dimly seen In these thy lowest works; yet these declare Thy goodness beyond thought, and power divine.
Page 51 - There are never more than two eggs found in the nest; these are about the size of small peas, and as white as snow, with here and there a yellow speck. The male and the female sit upon the nest by turns ; but the female takes to herself the greatest share. She seldom quits the...
Page 51 - Their, wings are in such rapid motion, that it is impossible to discern their colours, except by their glittering. They are never still, but continually in motion, visiting flower after flower, and extracting its honey as if with a kiss. For this purpose they are furnished with a forky tongue, that enters the cup of the flower, and extracts its nectared tribute.
Page 127 - The entire length, from the point of the nose to the end of the tail, is seven feet ten inches ; and the height three feet six inches.
Page 106 - Thy arts of building from the bee receive; Learn of the mole to plough, the worm to weave; Learn of the little nautilus to sail, Spread the thin oar, and catch the driving gale.
Page 51 - ... for the purpose. The female is the architect, while the male goes in quest of materials, such as cotton, fine moss, and the fibres of vegetables. Of these materials a nest is composed, about the size of a hen's egg cut in two: it is admirably contrived, and warmly lined with cotton.

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