A Concise Guide to Community Planning

Front Cover
McGraw Hill Professional, 1995 - Architecture - 209 pages
0 Reviews
Once an ad-hoc, informal process, community planning has now become a demanding discipline that gathers together architects, landscape architects, developers and civil engineers. This concise handbook provides an overview of land-development issues, as well as dozens of job-tested design strategies and real-life cases. From environmental impact to traffic congestion, from specialized demographic needs of the elderly and handicapped to proven rules of thumb in residential development, the book is full of do's and don'ts of effective community planning.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
1
Where Do I Begin?
21
Whats the Process? From Concept to Implementation
37
Copyright

9 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1995)

Gerald A. Porterfield is the President of the Porterfield Design Center based in Chesapeake, Virginia. He holds a B.S. in Landscape Architecture from West Virginia University and is a member of the Urban Land Institute as well as the American Planning Association. He is a frequent speaker on land development issues. Gerald A. Porterfield is the President of the Porterfield Design Center based in Chesapeake, Virginia. He holds a B.S. in Landscape Architecture from West Virginia University and is a member of the Urban Land Institute as well as the American Planning Association. He is a frequent speaker on land development issues.

Kenneth B. Hall, Jr. ASLA is a landscape architect with the award-winning firm Hanbury Evans Newill Vlattas & Company in Norfolk, Virginia where he specializes in community planning. He holds a B.S. in history from the University of Montevallo and a master's in landscape architecture from Virginia Tech. He has published a variety of articles focusing on issues related to community design. He is a member of the American Society of Landscape Architects and the Congress for New Urbanism.

Bibliographic information