A Concise History of Australia

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Cambridge University Press, Jun 29, 2009 - History - 354 pages
2 Reviews
Australia is the last continent to be settled by Europeans, but it also sustains a people and a culture tens of thousands years old. For much of the past 200 years the newcomers have sought to replace the old with the new. This book tells how they imposed themselves on the land, and brought technology, institutions and ideas to make it their own. It relates the advance from penal colony to a prosperous free nation and illustrates how, as a nation created by waves of newcomers, the search for binding traditions was long frustrated by the feeling of rootlessness, until it came to terms with its origins. The third edition of this acclaimed book recounts the key factors - social, economic and political - that have shaped modern-day Australia. It covers the rise and fall of the Howard government, the 2007 election and the apology to the stolen generation. More than ever before, Australians draw on the past to understand their future.
 

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Macintyre is glib to to point of extravagance. An excellent read over a swallow of brandy by a warm fire on a cold night. A glossed over fairytale, without the blood and guts on red soil wrought by the cultural genocide of an innocent peoples. Innocent they are in the eyes of a christian god because they knew not of the evils of money, opportunism, exploitation, and scurcy land grabbing more of the occupiers. The Australian nation is based on lies, murder and half-truths. You sir, Mr macintyre are a charlatan.  

Contents

Beginnings
1
Newcomers c 16001792
16
Coercion 17931821
35
Emancipation 182218 50
53
In thrall to progress 18511888
86
National reconstruction 18891913
122
Sacrifice 19141945
156
Golden age 19461974
200
Reinventing Australia 19752008
243
What next?
302
SOURCES OF QUOTATIONS
309
GUIDE TO FURTHER READING
326
INDEX
339
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

Stuart Macintyre is the Ernest Scott Professor of History at the University of Melbourne.

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