A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

Front Cover
Penguin, Nov 2, 2004 - Fiction - 384 pages
40 Reviews
Mark Twain moves from broad comedy to biting social satire in this literary classic.
 
Cracked on the head by a crowbar in nineteenth-century Connecticut, Hank Morgan wakes to find himself in King Arthur’s England. After using his knoweldge of an upcoming solar eclipse to escape a death sentence, Hank must then navigate his way through a medieval world whose idyllic surface masks fear, injustice, and ignorance.

Considered by H. L. Mencken to be “the most bitter critic of American platitude and delusion…that ever lived,” Twain enchants readers with a Camelot that strikes disturbingly contemporary notes in this acclaimed tour de force that encompasses both the pure joy of wild high jinks and deeply probing insights into the nature of man. 
 
With an Introduction by Leland Krauth
And an Afterword by Edmund Reiss
 

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User Review  - benuathanasia - LibraryThing

Like most readers, I everything I knew about this book came from pop-culture references. I was curious going into out the premise could be dragged out so long. Dragged is a poor word-choice in this ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Jessiqa - LibraryThing

Considering that I am a fan of Mark Twain and that I have a deep and abiding love of all things Arthurian, it's a bit surprising that it took me so long to read A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's ... Read full review

Contents

Introduction
ix
Preface
3
A Word of Explanation
5
Camelot
13
King Arthurs Court
16
Knights of the Table Round
22
Sir Dinadan the Humorist
28
An Inspiration
32
The Holy Fountain
151
Restoration of the Fountain
161
A Rival Magician
169
A Competitive Examination
180
The First Newspaper
192
The Yankee and the King Travel Incognito
202
Drilling the King
210
The Smallpox Hut
215

The Eclipse
38
Merlins Tower
45
The Boss
52
The Tournament
58
Beginnings of Civilization
64
The Yankee in Search of Adventures
69
Slow Torture
77
Freemen
82
Defend Thee Lord
90
Sandys Tale
94
Morgan le Fay
102
A Royal Banquet
109
In the Queens Dungeons
118
KnightErrantry as a Trade
128
The Ogres Castle
132
The Pilgrims
139
The Tragedy of the Manor House
222
Marco
232
Dowleys Humiliation
239
SixthCentury Political Economy
246
The Yankee and the King Sold as Slaves
258
A Pitiful Incident
269
An Encounter in the Dark
276
An Awful Predicament
280
Sir Launcelot and Knights to the Rescue
288
The Yankees Fight with the Knights
291
Three Tears Later
302
The Interdict
310
War
315
The Battle of the Sand Belt
327
A Postscript by Clarence
340
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Mark Twain was born Samuel Clemens in Florida, Missouri, in 1835, and died at Redding, Connecticut in 1910. In his person and in his pursuits, he was a man of extraordinary contrasts. Although he left school at twelve when his father died, he was eventually awarded honorary degrees from Yale University, the University of Missouri, and Oxford University. His career encompassed such varied occupations as printer, Mississippi riverboat pilot, journalist, travel writer, and publisher. He made fortunes from his writing but toward the end of his life he had to resort to lecture tours to pay his debts. He was hot-tempered, profane, and sentimental—and also pessimistic, cynical, and tortured by self-doubt. His nostalgia for the past helped produce some of his best books. He lives in American letters as a great artist, the writer whom William Dean Howells called “the Lincoln of our literature.”

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