A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

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Random House Publishing Group, May 31, 2005 - Fiction - 336 pages
33 Reviews
Hank Morgan awakens one morning to find he has been transported from nineteenth-century New England to sixth-century England and the reign of King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table. Morgan brings to King Arthur’s utopian court the ingenuity of the future, resulting in a culture clash that is at once satiric, anarchic, and darkly comic.

Critically deemed one of Twain’s finest and most caustic works, A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court is both a delightfully entertaining story and a disturbing analysis of the efficacy of government, the benefits of progress, and the dissolution of social mores. It remains as powerful a work of fiction today as it was upon its first publication in 1889.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - BookConcierge - LibraryThing

Audio book performed by William Defris Hank Morgan is an engineer and machinist in 1879 Connecticut. After a blow to the head that knocks him unconscious, he awakens beneath a tree and discovers he ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - buffalogr - LibraryThing

A time travel book, the first? Clemens' view of the 6th century from the 19th is amazing. And, I was in awe that the words he used in the 19th century are good in the 21st...slang for example. This is ... Read full review

Contents

CHAPTER
17
CHAPTER 6
31
CHAPTER 9
49
The Yankee in Search ofAdventures
59
Defend Thee Lord
79
A Royal Banquet
97
KnightErrantry as a Trade
115
The Holy Fountain
136
The Yankee and the King Travel Incognito
186
CHAPTER 30
213
CHAPTER 33
226
A Pitiful Incident
247
CHAPTER 38
265
Three Years Later
277
The Battle of the Sand Belt
300
CHAPTER 44
313

CHAPTER 24
154
A Competitive Examination
164

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Page 5 - Truly, said Sir Launcelot, yonder one knight shall I help, for it were shame for me to see three knights on one, and if he be slain I am partner of his death.
Page 24 - Arthur. Ye are more unwise, said Merlin, for the scabbard is worth ten of the sword, for while ye have the scabbard upon you ye shall never lose no blood, be ye never so sore wounded; therefore, keep well the scabbard always with you.
Page 14 - Friend, do me a kindness. Do you belong to the asylum, or are you just here on a visit or something like that?" He looked me over stupidly, and said — "Marry, fair, sir, me seemeth — " "That will do," I said; "I reckon you are a patient.

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About the author (2005)

Mark Twain, born Samuel Langhorne Clemens in 1835, led one of the most exciting and adventuresome of literary lives. Raised in the river town of Hannibal, Missouri, Twain had to leave school at age twelve to seek work. He was successfully a journeyman printer, a steamboat pilot, a halfhearted Confederate soldier (for a few weeks), and a prospector, miner, a reporter in the western territories. With the publication in 1865 of “The Celebrated Jumping Frog of Calaveras County,” Twain gained national attention as a frontier humorist, and with The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1855), he was acknowledged by the literary establishment as one of the greatest writers America would ever produce.

In 1880 Twain began promoting and financing heavily the ill-fated Paige typesetter, an invention designed to make the printing process fully automatic. This enterprise drained his energy and funds for almost fifteen years, until it drove him to the brink of bankruptcy. Ironically at the height of his naively optimistic involvement in his technological “wonder,” he published his satirical A Connecticut Yankee in King’s Arthur’s Court (1889), as though the writer in him could see the dangers the investor in him was blind to.

Toward the end of his life, plagued by personal tragedy and financial failure, Mark Twain grew more and more pessimistic–an outlook not alleviated by his natural skepticism and sarcasm. Though his fame continued to widen. Twain spent his last years in gloom and exasperation, writing fables about “the damned human race.”

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