A Country Not Considered: Canada, Culture, Work

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Anansi, 1993 - Literary Collections - 179 pages
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"According to the U.S. novelist Ken Kesey, Canada has “never been considered” as a possible source of cultural significance, let alone enlightenment. In this series of essays Tom Wayman takes Kesey's offhand comment as a point of departure for an exploration of the undiscovered territory of Canadian culture."

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About the author (1993)

Tom Wayman was born in Ontario in 1945, but has spent most of his life in British Columbia. He has worked at a number of jobs, both blue and white-collar, across Canada and the U.S., and has helped bring into being a new movement of poetry in these countries--the incorporation of the actual conditions and effects of daily work. His poetry has been awarded the Canadian Authors' Association medal for poetry, the A.J.M. Smith Prize, first prize in the USA Bicentennial Poetry Awards competition, and the Acorn-Plantos Award; in 2003 he was shortlisted for the Governor-General's Literary Award. He has published more than a dozen collections of poems, six poetry anthologies, three collections of essays and three books of prose fiction. He has taught widely at the post-secondary level in Canada and the U.S., most recently (2002-2010) at the University of Calgary. Since 1989 he has been the Squire of "Appledore," his estate in the Selkirk Mountains of southeastern BC.

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