A Course in Calculus and Real Analysis

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, Jun 5, 2006 - Mathematics - 432 pages
Calculus is one of the triumphs of the human mind. It emerged from inv- tigations into such basic questions as ?nding areas, lengths and volumes. In the third century B. C. , Archimedes determined the area under the arc of a parabola. In the early seventeenth century, Fermat and Descartes studied the problem of ?nding tangents to curves. But the subject really came to life in the hands of Newton and Leibniz in the late seventeenth century. In part- ular, they showed that the geometric problems of ?nding the areas of planar regions and of ?nding the tangents to plane curves are intimately related to one another. In subsequent decades, the subject developed further through the work of several mathematicians, most notably Euler, Cauchy, Riemann, and Weierstrass. Today,calculus occupies a centralplacein mathematics and is an essential component of undergraduate education. It has an immense number of app- cations both within and outside mathematics. Judged by the sheer variety of the concepts and results it has generated, calculus can be rightly viewed as a fountainhead of ideas and disciplines in mathematics. Real analysis, often called mathematical analysis or simply analysis, may be regarded as a formidable counterpart of calculus. It is a subject where one revisits notionsencountered in calculus, but with greaterrigor and sometimes with greater generality. Nonetheless, the basic objects of study remain the same, namely, real-valued functions of one or several real variables. This book attempts to give a self-contained and rigorous introduction to calculusoffunctionsofonevariable.
 

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Contents

I
1
III
2
IV
10
V
13
VI
31
VII
43
X
55
XI
60
XXXVI
218
XXXVII
227
XXXIX
228
XL
240
XLI
253
XLII
260
XLIII
269
XLIV
274

XII
67
XV
72
XVI
81
XVII
96
XVIII
103
XX
104
XXI
117
XXII
125
XXIII
131
XXIV
138
XXV
147
XXVIII
150
XXIX
157
XXX
161
XXXI
173
XXXII
179
XXXIII
189
XXXIV
200
XXXV
211
XLV
284
XLVI
291
XLVII
298
XLVIII
311
XLIX
318
L
324
LI
336
LII
352
LIII
361
LIV
367
LV
376
LVI
384
LVII
392
LVIII
398
LIX
410
LX
419
LXI
422
LXII
427
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