A Critical Handbook of Children's Literature

Front Cover
DIANE Publishing, 1998 - 309 pages
5 Reviews
A Critical Handbook of Children's Literature, Ninth Edition, gives future teachers, practicing teachers, librarians, and parents many examples of quality children's literature to guide them in choosing the best books for the classroom, library, or home. The Handbook analyzes children's books that showcase positive examples of the literary elements, formats, and genres that are the focus in the field of children's literature. The books are noteworthy children's books, from classics to favorites to just-published titles, all selected as thought-provoking, important, or motivating choices. The authors suggest that readers examine the Handbook and then apply the literary concepts to additional reading from today's ever-expanding selection of children's books.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

Horrible, horrible book unless you are writing a d

User Review  - Arizona Mom - Borders

This book sounds like a doctoral thesis. It is horrible, horrible, horrible to read. The author sets up a topic, writes one sentence and then will spend two pages quoting children's literature ... Read full review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Oops---someone fell asleep at the scanner.....

All 5 reviews »

Contents

B Scanning
10
D Piggybacking and Tailgating
11
E False Data Entry Data Diddling
12
F Superzapping
13
G Scavenging and Reuse
14
H Trojan Horses
15
I Computer Viruses
16
J Salami Techniques
18
K Trap Doors
20
L Logic Bombs
21
M Asynchronous Attacks
22
N Data Leakage
23
P Computer and Computer Components Larceny
24
Q Use of Computers for Criminal Enterprise
25
Experts and Suspects
27
1 Electronics and Programming Experts and Witnesses
28
3 Computer Scientists
29
6 Mainframe Computer Users
30
8 Information Systems Users and Developers
31
10 Information and Computer Security Specialists
32
11 Auditors
33
B Characterizing Suspects
36
1 Suspects Characteristics and Circumstances Based on Experience
38
2 Antagonistic Personnel and Organization Relationships
40
The Computer Crime Environment
43
B The Information Systems Organization
45
2 Computer Operations
47
C Physical Facilities for Computers
51
1 Protection Facilities
52
3 Operation and Production Areas
53
4 Mechanical and Electrical Support Facilities
54
D The Impact of Data Communications
55
2 The Information Systems Organization
56
4 Future Considerations
57
2 Functional Locations of Vulnerabilities
59
4 Vulnerabilities from Natural Forces
60
Computer Crime Prosecution
63
1 Definitions of Computers
64
2 Definitions of Computer Programs
65
B Computer Evidence Considerations
66
3 Personal Computer Crime Investigation
68
5 Caring for Evidence
72
6 Privacy and Secrecy of Evidence
73
C Prosecution
74
2 Proprietary Rights of Computer Programs
75
3 Evidentiary Problems with Computer Records
76

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 147 - This section shall not be construed to preclude the applicability of any other provision of the criminal law...
Page 109 - Comment at 71, it is a crime for two or more persons to conspire to (commit any offense or) defraud the United States. This leads to an anomaly: the planning of an act, not criminal in itself, may be a crime. The implications for software abuse are enormous. The broad scope of what it means to "defraud" the United States can be seen in the leading case in this area, Haas v.
Page 150 - financial record" means information derived from any record held by a financial institution pertaining to a customer's relationship with the financial institution; (6) the term "exceeds authorized access" means to access a computer with authorization and to use such access to obtain or alter information in the computer that the accesser is not entitled so to obtain or alter; (7) the term "department of the United States...
Page 149 - ... or an attempt to commit an offense punishable under this subparagraph; and (B) a fine under this title or imprisonment for not more than ten years, or both, in the case of an offense under subsection...
Page 149 - ... of a computer not exclusively for such use, used by or for a financial institution or the United States Government and the conduct constituting the offense affects...
Page 100 - literary works' does not connote any criterion of literary merit or qualitative value: it includes catalogs, directories, and similar factual, reference, or instructional works and compilations of data. It also includes computer data bases, and computer programs to the extent that they incorporate authorship in the programmer's expression of original ideas, as distinguished from the ideas themselves.
Page 97 - As used in this section (1) the term "computer" means an electronic, magnetic, optical, electrochemical, or other high speed data processing device performing logical, arithmetic, or storage functions, and includes any data storage facility or communications facility directly related to or operating in conjunction with such device, but such term does not include an automated typewriter or typesetter, a portable hand held calculator, or other similar device...
Page 104 - stolen" as used in the crime of interstate transportation of stolen motor vehicles includes all felonious takings of motor vehicles with the intent to deprive the owner of the rights and benefits of ownership.
Page 148 - Whoever, with intent or reason to believe that it is to be used to the injury of the United States or to the advantage of a foreign nation...
Page 7 - For the purpose of this paper, the term will be defined as an illegal act or series of illegal acts committed by nonphysical means and by concealment or guile, to obtain money or property, to avoid the payment or loss of money or property, or to obtain business or personal advantage.

References to this book

All Book Search results »

Bibliographic information