A Critical Introduction to Modern Arabic Poetry

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Cambridge University Press, 1975 - Literary Criticism - 289 pages
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This book is the first critical survey of the development and achievements of 'modern' Arabic poetry, here signifying the period from the latter half of the nineteenth century to the present day. It ranges over the entire Arabic-speaking world and includes a discussion of the work of poets who emigrated to the United States and Latin America. Four main stages are examined in the development of a specifically modern Arabic poetry: the 'neoclassical', in which poets turned to their literary heritage for their ideals and inspiration; the pre-romantic', which was marked by a tension between a modified classical style and new romantic sentiments, itself the reflection of a wider cultural movement towards change and modernization; the 'romantic', in which the tensions between form and content were resolved, and a lyricism and simplicity of language become the norm; and the 'modern' or 'contemporary' which is typified by a reaction against romanticism, and dominated by either committed social realism or symbolism and surrealism. In the absence of any similar published work in a European language, the book, as well as being designed for students of Arabic literature and of comparative literature, will also be of interest to the general reader. No knowledge of Arabic is presupposed: all the verse (newly translated by the author) is given in English translation, and technical terminology has been reduced to a minimum.
 

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A read-in-one-breathe book. Very much enjoyed it. The language is pretty simple for a critical book, besides it's written in quite an interesting way that doesn't let you get bored, rather keeps you on the right path throughout reading.
Do recommend!

Contents

Introductory
1
Neoclassicism
14
Barudi
16
Shauqi
29
Hafiz Ibrahim
42
Zahawi
47
Rusafi
55
Jawahiri
62
Shabbi
157
Tijani
168
Abu Risha
172
The emigrant poets
179
In the United States
181
In Latin America
196
Mahjar poetry and romantic poetry
202
The recoil from romanticism
204

The preromantics
68
The Diwan Group
84
Shukri
92
Mazini
105
Aqqad
109
The romantics
115
Abu Shadi and the Apollo Group
116
Naji
129
Taha
137
Abu Shabaka
145
Bayyati and the committed poets
210
Experiments in form
223
Adunis and the New Poetry
231
Khal and Hawi
241
Sayyab
250
General remarks on the contemporary poets
258
Epilogue
261
NOTES TO THE TEXT
266
INDEX
285
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About the author (1975)

Martin Handford, the man behind the mind-boggling Waldo books, began his career as a freelance illustrator specializing in drawing crowd scenes. "I can’t tell you how pleased I am that Waldo has taken on a life of his own," he says. "I’d like to inspire children to open their minds to explore subjects more, to be aware of what’s going on around them. I’d like them to see wonder in places that may not have occurred to them." Martin Handford lives in England.

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