A Cry for Justice: Daniel Rudd and His Life in Black Catholicism, Journalism, and Activism, 1854-1933

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University of Arkansas Press, Dec 1, 2011 - Social Science - 253 pages
Daniel A. Rudd, born a slave in Bardstown, Kentucky, grew up to achieve much in the years following the Civil War. His Catholic faith, passion for activism, and talent for writing led him to increasingly influential positions in many places. One of his important early accomplishments was the publication of the American Catholic Tribune, which Rudd referred to as "the only Catholic journal owned and published by colored men." At its zenith, the Tribune, run out of Detroit and Cincinnati, where Rudd lived, had ten thousand subscribers, making it one of the most successful black newspapers in the country. Rudd was also active in the leadership of the Afro-American Press Association, and he was a founding member of the Catholic Press Association. By 1889, Rudd was one of the nation's best-known black Catholics. His work was endorsed by a number of high-ranking church officials in Europe as well as in the United States, and he was one of the founders of the Lay Catholic Congress movement. Later, his travels took him to Bolivar County, Mississippi, and eventually on to Forrest City, Arkansas, where he worked for the well-known black farmer and businessperson, Scott Bond, and eventually co-wrote Bond's biography.
 

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Contents

1 Daniel Rudd and the Establishment of the American Catholic Tribune
1
2 A New Civilization Based on the Fatherhood of God and the Bro therhood of Man
37
3 Archbishop John Irelands Masterly Plea for Justice
55
4 Justice for African Americans
83
5 Beyond Co ncerns of Race
109
6 The Colored Catholic Congress Movemen t 18891894
141
7 Daniel Rudds PostACT Years i n the South
167
CONCLUSION
189
NOTES
191
SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY
221
INDEX
228
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Gary B. Agee is adjunct professor of church history at Anderson School of Theology, Anderson University.

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