A Cyclopaedia of Drug Pathogenesy, Volume 3

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Gould, 1890
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Page 490 - Of this at least I feel assured, that there is no such thing as forgetting possible to the mind ; a thousand accidents may and will interpose a veil between our present consciousness and the secret inscriptions on the mind ; accidents of the same sort will also rend away this veil ; but alike, whether veiled or unveiled, the inscription remains for ever...
Page 490 - I have called the tyranny of the human face, began to unfold itself. Perhaps some part of my London life might be answerable for this. Be that as it may, now it was that upon the rocking waters of the ocean the human face began to appear; the sea appeared paved with innumerable faces, upturned to the heavens; faces, imploring, wrathful, despairing, surged upwards by thousands, by myriads, by generations, by centuries : my agitation was in1mite, my mind tossed and surged with the ocean.
Page 488 - I can tell them to go, and they go ; but sometimes they come when I don't tell them to come.
Page 489 - I was once told by a near relative of mine, that having in her childhood fallen into a river, and being on the very verge of death but for the...
Page 489 - I seemed every night to descend, not metaphorically, but literally to descend, into chasms and sunless abysses, depths below depths, from which it seemed hopeless that I could ever reascend. Nor did I, by waking, feel that I had reascended.
Page 490 - The waters now changed their character — from translucent lakes shining like mirrors they now became seas and oceans. And now came a tremendous change, which, unfolding itself slowly like a scroll through many months, promised an abiding torment ; and in fact it never left me until the winding up of my case.
Page 489 - That as the creative state of the eye increased, a sympathy seemed to arise between the waking and the dreaming states of the brain in one point— that whatsoever I happened to call up and to trace by a voluntary act upon the darkness was very apt to transfer itself to my dreams, so that I feared to exercise this faculty; for, as Midas turned all things to gold that yet baffled his hopes and defrauded his human desires, so whatsoever things capable of being visually represented I did but think of...
Page 489 - The sense of space, and in the end, the sense of time, were both powerfully affected. Buildings, landscapes, &c., were exhibited in proportions so vast as the bodily eye is not fitted to receive. Space swelled, and was amplified to an extent of unutterable infinity.
Page 489 - I did but think of in the darkness, immediately shaped themselves into phantoms of the eye ; and, by a process apparently no less inevitable, when thus once traced in faint and visionary colours, like writings in sympathetic ink, they were drawn out by the fierce chemistry of my dreams, into insufferable splendour that fretted my heart. "2. For this and all other changes in my dreams, were accompanied by deep-seated anxiety and gloomy melancholy, such as are wholly incommunicable by words.
Page 492 - The digestive organs are in the highest degree disturbed ; tbe sufferer eats scarcely anything, and has hardly one evacuation in a week; his mental and bodily powers are destroyed.

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