A Daughter of the Sioux a Tale of the Indian Frontier

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Kessinger Publishing, Aug 1, 2004 - Fiction - 324 pages
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1902. Also illustrated by Edwin Willard Deming. While many of his books were written under the name Captain Charles King, for some he is listed as General. The literary novels of Charles King are ones of Victorian ideals, morals and views played out on western frontiers, the Civil War, and the Spanish Philippines. His often melodramatic stories are based on personal adventures and experiences with detailed observations and opinions arising from specific times and places. Publishing over 60 novels and numerous short stories, King was a popular author in his day, yet today is known mostly for one title, Campaigning With Crook. The book begins: The major commanding looked up from the morning report and surveyed the post adjutant with something of perturbation, if not annoyance, in his grim, gray eyes. For the fourth time that week had Lieutenant Field requested permission to be absent for several hours. The major knew just why the junior wished to go and where. The major knew just why he wished him not to go, but saw fit to name almost any other than the real reason when, with a certain awkward hesitancy he began: W-ell, is the post return ready? See other titles by this author available from Kessinger Publishing.

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About the author (2004)

Frederic Sackrider Remington (October 4, 1861 - December 26, 1909) was an American painter, illustrator, sculptor, and writer who specialized in depictions of the Old American West, specifically concentrating on the last quarter of the 19th century American West and images of cowboys, American Indians, and the U. S. Cavalry. Remington attended the art school at Yale University. He left Yale in 1879 to take care of his ailing father who had tuberculosis. Remington did not return to Yale, instead when his father died he made a trip out to Montana. This trip colored the type of illustrations, sculpture, and novels he would create for the rest of his life. Remington died after an emergency appendectomy led to peritonitis on December 26, 1909. His extreme obesity (weighing in at nearly 300 pounds) had complicated the anesthesia and the surgery. He is buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Canton, New York.

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