A Day and a Night and a Day: A Novel

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Harper Collins, Jan 6, 2009 - Fiction - 244 pages
4 Reviews

In a windowless cell, a man hangs from a pair of handcuffs.

He is an american.

His torturer will stop at nothing to extract the information he requires.

He, too, is an american.

A Day and a Night and a Day is a Grand Inquisition for the twenty-first century, in which love, loyalty, reason, and truth are on trial, and morality hangs in the balance. It is the story of Augustus Rose, an unlikely operative in a terrorist network, and his interrogator, Harper, a ruthless ambassador for the darkest forces at work in our times.

Beyond the law and without hope of escape or reprieve, Augustus endures an emotional and physical assault that brings his whole life under brutal scrutiny: his race, religion, politics, and past, the people he has loved, and the few he is still desperate to protect. Alone and certain of death, Augustus raises the only shield he has: memory.

He remembers his outcast Euro-American mother, Juliet, whose erratic love was refuge from the unforgiving streets of Harlem in the 1950s; he recalls the strange solace of Elise Merkete, the ravaged vigilante who recruited him into the ranks of her underground army; he relives the cool touch of the young Spanish prostitute, InÚs, perhaps the last female tenderness he's ever likely to know.

Outshining them all is the memory of Selina, a stunning, troubled, and rebellious white New York aristocrat. Their epic, taboo love affair, begun in 1960s Manhattan, would yield a lifetime's worth of passion, heartbreak, and wanderlust, leading Augustus from Harlem to Greenwich Village, from El Salvador to Barcelona, from Morocco to a bleak British island where death seems his only companion.

Dramatic, far-reaching, and beautifully written, A Day and a Night and a Day is both a piercing love story and a timely, harrowing evaluation of the shape the Western world is taking.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - missizicks - LibraryThing

Not his best book, but still really well written. It pulls you along, and there are some interesting ideas, but at times you can see him thinking too hard and trying to show off his research too much. I also thought the ending was quite weak for him. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AHS-Wolfy - LibraryThing

Augustus Rose, mixed race American and member of an anti-terrorist terrorist cell, has been captured and is being tortured (mostly left undescribed, thankfully) to reveal all he knows about his ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
4
Section 3
18
Section 4
19
Section 5
20
Section 6
45
Section 7
47
Section 8
62
Section 10
139
Section 11
200
Section 12
201
Section 13
243
Section 14
244
Section 15
245
Section 16
246
Copyright

Section 9
63

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About the author (2009)

Glen Duncan is the critically acclaimed author of six previous novels, including Death of an Ordinary Man; I, Lucifer; and, most recently, The Bloodstone Papers. He lives in London.

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