A Day for the Hunter, a Day for the Prey: Popular Music and Power in Haiti

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University of Chicago Press, Jun 21, 1997 - History - 276 pages
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The history of Haiti throughout the twentieth century has been marked by oppression at the hands of colonial and dictatorial overlords. But set against this "day for the hunter" has been a "day for the prey," a history of resistance, and sometimes of triumph. With keen cultural and historical awareness, Gage Averill shows that Haiti's vibrant and expressive music has been one of the most highly charged instruments in this struggle—one in which power, politics, and resistance are inextricably fused.

Averill explores such diverse genres as Haitian jazz, troubadour traditions, Vodou-jazz, konpa, mini-djaz, new generation, and roots music. He examines the complex interaction of music with power in contexts such as honorific rituals, sponsored street celebrations, Carnival, and social movements that span the political spectrum.

With firsthand accounts by musicians, photos, song texts, and ethnographic descriptions, this book explores the profound manifestations of power and song in the day-to-day efforts of ordinary Haitians to rise above political repression.
 

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Contents

Introduction A Message to Pass from Mouth to Mouth
1
Living from Their Own Garden The Discourse of Authenticity
32
Konpadirek for Life Francois Duvaliers Dictatorship and Konpadirek
71
Musicians Are a Single Family Critical Discourse in Music under Baby Doc Duvalier
108
Watch Out for Them Dechoukaj and Its Aftermath
161
Carnival of Hope
208
Notes
213
Glossary
237
Bibliography
245
Discography
255
Interviews
259
Index
261
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