A Day of Gladness: The Sabbath Among Jews and Christians in Antiquity

Front Cover
Univ of South Carolina Press, 2003 - Religion - 262 pages
0 Reviews
A study of the wide spectrum of theological views on the Sabbath in the Jewish and Christian faiths of antiquity; In A Day of Gladness, Herold Weiss compares the ways in which Christians and Jews of antiquiry viewed the Sabbath. Rather than attending to the minutiae of its observance among Jews or its connection with Sunday observance among Christians, he examines major extant texts for the fundamental religious concerns of their authors and communities, particularly how those concerns shaped their thoughts about the Sabbath. Weiss contends that the wide spectrums of theological beliefs illustrate the internal diversities of these two faiths as well as their commonalities. To explore Jewish perspectives, Weiss looks to the Rabbinic and Qumranic texts, Samaritan texts, and the writings of Philo and of Josephus. To illumine early Christian attitudes, he offers analyses of the Synoptic Gospels, the Gospels of John and Thomas, and the letters to the Galatians, the Romans, the Hebrews, and the Colossians. Weiss uses each text as a window upon the sociological constructs and theological perspectives figuring in early Jewish and Christian thought about worship and rest. He suggests that s
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Introduction
10
Philo on the Sabbath
32
The Sabbath among the Samaritans
52
The Sabbath in the Writings of Josephus
65
The Sabbath in the Synoptic Gospels
86
The Sabbath in the Gospels of John and Thomas
98
The Sabbath in the Letters of Paul
111
The Sabbath in the Letter to the Colossians 732
132
Gods Sabbath in the Epistle to the Hebrews
147
Notes
183
Bibliography
223
Index of Biblical References
243
Index of Ancient Texts
249
Index of Names and Subjects
257
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

About the author (2003)

Herold Weiss is professor emeritus of religious studies at Saint Mary's College in Notre Dame, Indiana.

Bibliographic information