A Deadly Shade of Gold: A Travis McGee Novel

Front Cover
Random House Publishing Group, Jan 8, 2013 - Fiction - 416 pages
5 Reviews
When Travis McGee discovers a face from his past lying in a pool of blood on a cheap motel room floor, he wants answers. But so far, all he has are questions--plus the dubious inheritance of his friend's vengeance-driven girlfriend, and a valuable ancient Aztec golden idol. Part rebel, part philosopher, and every inch his own man, Travis McGee plunges into a wild and perilous trek for a killer that takes him from the Lauderdale beaches to the seething corruption of American expatriates in a distant Mexican town, to the lush high life of the California jet set.
"A master storyteller, a wizard of dialogue, characterization, and plot."
Chicago Tribune Book World
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - terrygraap - LibraryThing

Another outstanding book in the Travis McGee series by John D. McDonald. McGee tries to locate some gold figurines and almost gets killed doing it. I recommend it. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - kaulsu - LibraryThing

I suppose it is only fair: some books are chick lit, and some appeal equally to all. This one, however, was overloaded with testosterone. Yet, I did become involved in the story. Travis McGee is ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
17
Section 3
24
Section 4
32
Section 5
50
Section 6
62
Section 7
86
Section 8
125
Section 12
205
Section 13
258
Section 14
276
Section 15
302
Section 16
316
Section 17
349
Section 18
376
Section 19
389

Section 9
150
Section 10
173
Section 11
186
Section 20
403
Copyright

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About the author (2013)

John D. MacDonald was an American novelist and short-story writer. His works include the Travis McGee series and the novel The Executioners, which was adapted into the film Cape Fear. In 1962 MacDonald was named a Grand Master of the Mystery Writers of America; in 1980, he won a National Book Award. In print he delighted in smashing the bad guys, deflating the pompous, and exposing the venal. In life, he was a truly empathetic man; his friends, family, and colleagues found him to be loyal, generous, and practical. In business, he was fastidiously ethical. About being a writer, he once expressed with gleeful astonishment, “They pay me to do this! They don’t realize, I would pay them.” He spent the later part of his life in Florida with his wife and son. He died in 1986.

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